February 05, 2005

A new Indian Army command South-West is born

EXCLUSIVE DEFENCE -Smarter, Sharper - SAIKAT DATTA

The army streamlines. A new command—South-West—is born.

The Indian army will have a new, high-profile rapid-action strike command to take on Pakistan along the Punjab-Rajasthan sector.

It will be called the South-West Command (see box for each command's geographical distribution) and will be made up of integrated battle groups with the capability to "obliterate


The Original Division



an enemy objective" rather than merely hold ground. Outlook has learnt that the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) finally cleared this long-pending demand of the army at its January 28 meeting. According to sources, it took some persuasion on Union defence minister Pranab Mukherjee's part to convince his cabinet colleagues that the creation of the new command was imperative. Hours later, outgoing army chief Gen N.C. Vij walked out beaming, to tell senior mates that the green signal had been given.

The new command, the product of major brainstorming in army headquarters for over five years, is a bid to rationalise its operational readiness in keeping with its new war doctrine which was introduced last year.



Operation Parakram revealed the difficulties in a long and protracted deployment.


This doctrine has moved away from the earlier concept of holding and strike formations, and instead looks at integrated battle groups. The 11-month vigil on the western borders during Operation Parakram in 2001-02 revealed that protracted deployment


was problematic—susceptible as it was to pressure from the international community, which treats it as a 'hostile' buildup. A permanent, decicated command was seen as preferable.

The key operational features of the new command will be:


Accent on mobility rather than holding ground; a developed capacity to strike deep into enemy area.


Can strike at several enemy targets simultaneously.


It will be primarily offensive; oriented towards a short, sharp war.


Better interface with the air force. Hence, better coordinated operations.

The impetus for creating the new command was prompted by what was happening in Northern Command. Past conflicts with Pakistan revealed several problems in the Shakargargh bulge in northern Punjab. What was also worrisome was the huge responsibilities that had tied down its Nagrota-based 16 Corps.

This corps, considered the largest formation of its kind anywhere in the world, was bogged down with too many operational duties. For instance, it was deploying formations in the mountains as well as planning for operations in the plains south of Jammu. While it had conventional defensive and offensive responsibilities in the event of a war, it also had to oversee counter-terrorist operations. With so much on its plate affecting its operational capabilities, army HQ thought that it was time for a massive shakeout.

The new command would mean that the responsibilities of the Northern, Western and Southern Commands would be rationalised to improve their strike capabilities. Earlier, these three commands would be responsible for varied tasks: taking on mountain warfare, counter-insurgency operations and planning offensive operations in the plains. For example, Nagrota's 16 Corps, under the new order, will primarily look at counter-terrorist and defensive operations. The strike capability will henceforth rest with the Western Command and the new South-West Command. "This would mean improving our ability to inflict optimum damage on the enemy," says a senior army officer.

To prepare the ground for the new command, the army commissioned a study two years ago. It was also looking at creating a North-West Command, but the plan was junked in favour of a South-West Command. An officer commanding a corps in the Northeast has been identified to be the first chief of the South-West command. And how was this new command actually formed? The HQ pulled out a corps from Western Command and reallocated it to South-West Command.

To compensate, it also created a new corps under Western Command and has given it two infantry divisions pulled out of the bulky 16 Corps.The Pune-based Southern Command has also been affected; it is now left with only one corps which is oriented for desert warfare as well as operations in the Rann of Kutch.

As can be imagined, all this rearranging was attended by the usual share of teething problems. Even as the army top brass celebrates the government's sanctions, Outlook has learnt that there were objections to the massive reorganisation that were left unaddressed.

So far, all counter-terrorist operations have been conducted under Northern Command, headquartered in Udhampur. The shifting of two infantry divisions to Western Command has now put the force in a piquant position. Earlier, an affected state government would coordinate counter-terrorist operations with the Northern Command. Now, it will also have to liaise with Western Command. Logistical complications on the ground would be a natural corollary.

The movement of the two infantry divisions could also create other bottlenecks for Northern Command. Till now all its logistics supplies—ammunition, fuel, oil, lubricants etc—were being routed through bases within Northern Command. The present reorganisation has now placed all those bases under Western Command. So, how will operations be streamlined? In fact, these were the very reasons which led to the demise of a North-West Command at the conceptual stage itself.

While these issues need ironing out, the real reason for its existence stares at the new command from across the border in the Punjab-Rajasthan sector: Pakistan's II Corps, based in Multan, and the Bahawalpur-based xxxi Corps, which the Pakistan Army General HQ in Rawalpindi created a decade ago. II Corps, also known as Army Reserve South, is a designated reserve corps and has the capabilities of a strike unit. This, then, is the real challenge the new South-West Command must face up to.

http://www.outlookindia.com/full.asp?fodname=20050214&fname=Army+%28F%29&sid=1

2 Muslims held with weapons-grade uranium in UP

2 held with weapons-grade uranium
LALIT KUMAR

TIMES NEWS NETWORK[ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 05, 2005 02:00:05 PM ]

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1012203.cms

BAREILLY: Cops at Izzatnagar police station here could hardly believe their ears when a duo they had detained on the suspicion of being small-time drug peddlers said that the thick-taped plates recovered from them contained radioactive uranium.

The metal plates were recovered from Khurshid and Aslam on December 8. The plates were in a lead-lined sophisticated metal box. The sceptical cops booked the two for possession of opium and, almost as an afterthought, sent the metal to Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in Mumbai for examination.

Jaws of the police brass fell when the BARC report stated that the 253.6 gram of dense gray metal was 99 per cent uranium by weight. The significance of this was stunning: the technology for making atom bomb is readily available, what’s not is enriched uranium as it can only be processed by state-owned sophisticated facilities.

Naturally, the discovery has now triggered a huge investigation by Central and state investigative agencies to get to the bottom of the mystery. How did the nondescript duo get hold of weapons-grade uranium? And where was it headed?

When asked by TOI , senior police sources didn’t rule out the possibility of the uranium having come from the Narora atomic facility in Bulandshahr district. The CISF senior commandant at Narora Atomic Power Station has written to the Bareilly SSP for information about the recovered matter.

Intriguingly, a list naming substances with specific industrial use was recovered from the two arrested persons.

Unfortunately for investigators, the initial delay meant that the man named by Khurshid and Aslam as the supplier of the metal, a Nagpur-based scrap dealer by the colourful name of Mahboob Bhai Germanwale, had died in the interim period.

Izzatnagar house officer R R Mishra feels that the duo could be tossing up a red herring by naming Germanwale. "In any case, how were we expected to believe that the metal carried by these apparent small-timers could help make a nuclear bomb?"



COMMENT BY A SAAG FORUM MEMBER



Pl note the names of the duo and the supplier. The episode highlights lack of integrity in the security set up. Basically one can buy his way out of anywhere and with anything. Corruption is eating into all aspects of our governance and civic life.

Some months ago it was the metal scrap imported through a Paki supplier from the middle east. Instead of informing the investigating agencies, importers were throwing it all over the place. In effect, the whole issue reached a dead end, instead of exposing how deep rooted is the involvement of ISI and anti-national elements.

They entice Hindus by offering huge sums of money and blackmail. Whereas with muslims its simply the lure of religious duty.

We are living in dangerous times. Let the educated and aware citizens get together to fight the anti-nationals. Giving and taking bribes is also anti-national. Please join 'Parivartan.com' and expand the organisation.

February 04, 2005

Justice system under siege, redundant in Bharat

Here are two news reports:

1. a HC judge of Patna High Court seeks transfer;

2. SC flays media trials.

Both point to the state of siege of the justice system in the country.
I am not even referring to the case reported today that the murder
charges against NT Rama Rao's son have been dismissed by a court in
Andhra Pradesh. While these are symptomatic and anecdotal evidences,
the pattern is clear.

The writ of the court does not run in the criminalised polity. A CM of
Tamil Nadu has the temerity to question a judgement of the Supreme
Court by writing to substitute PM giving him a lecture on how people
should not go from one 'forum' to another 'forum' to seek bail. So,
what happens? Goonda Act is slapped to prevent people seeking bail in
forum after forum.

This is a situation where the niceties and fineprint in lawbooks no
longer apply. This is raw warfare among three segments of civil
society: journalists, police force and lawyers/judges.

When judges fail to prosecute fair trials, journalists seem to
arrogate to themselves the role of conducting trial by media and
police force behave like pocket-bureaus of criminalised politicians
(official-private armies dancing to the tunes of bureaucratic/politcal
bosses because of threats of transfers or suspensions).

There is not even scope to discuss (aha, policy!) if the nation should
have an FBI type of police force. Subramanian Swamy is fighting out to
make CBI such a body (the petition has just been referred to a 5-judge
bench to enable CBI to start investigating without obtaining prior
permission from central government in cases to bush-shirt bureaucray
above the level of Jt. Secretary).

CBI is used as a convenient buck-passing forum. Witness the way a
theft in Kolkata museum was transferred to CBI and witness how the
Kanchi Acharya case is not so transffered. There is clearly, a lot of
politicking with CBI, as happens with the police force (aha, state
subject, another policy issue!)

Justice system is not merely under siege, it is becoming redundant
when the constitution gets subverted on a day-to-day basis. Even
forgetting the crores of cases pending in courts. Make merry with
files and folders, one can computerise them these days.

Or, is all this discussion taboo, governed by the contempt of court
law where truth is no defence? Is justice system like Caesar's wife
above suspicion? Virgin, don't touch her!

I am not even bringing up the issue of L. Sternbach's Juridical
studies in ancient Indian law, lest I am accused of bringing up
irrelevant junk from history. I am not even citing Vidura's Ni_ti.

Dhanyavaadah.

Kalyanaraman

HC Judge seeks transfer out of Bihar

Press Trust of India

Patna, February 422:52 IST

In a sudden move, Patna High Court Judge RS Garg on Friday sought his
transfer out of Bihar following a protest by Muslims after police
picked up an official of a nearby mosque over alleged violation of a
directive on use of loud speaker for prayers.

"My image has been publicly maligned by the protests. In the given
situation, I will not be able to discharge my work in Patna and
therefore, I have requested for my transfer," Garg told PTI over
phone.

He said he had written a letter to the Supreme Court Chief Justice,
seeking his transfer from Patna.

Taking strong exception to the use of loud speakers at a mosque
adjacent to the High Court, Justice Garg had summoned District
Magistrate and the Superintendent of Police asking them to explain
whether the use of loud speaker at the Friday prayer which caused
disturbances during the court proceedings, was not violative of an
earlier court order, which restrained the mosque from using loud
speaker during court hours.

http://hindustantimes.com/news/181_1228573,000900030002.htm

Apex Court flays "trial by media"


New Delhi, Feb. 5. (PTI): Terming trial by media as a 'disturbing
factor' in the administration of justice, the Supreme Court on Friday
cautioned the press from publishing one- sided stories pertaining to
trial in criminal cases.

The observations came from a Bench of Justice N Santosh Hegde and
Justice S B Sinha while dealing with a case of alleged dowry death in
Kolkata.

The apex court was furious over an article titled "Doomed by Dowry"
based on the interview of the family of deceased in in a Bangla
magazine when the application for the grant of anticipatory bail was
disposed by the Calcutta High Court.

Citing the one-sided v/":ersion of the case in the article, the Bench
said: "The facts narrated therein are all materials that may be used
in the forthcoming trial in this case and we have no hesitation that
this type of article appearing in the media would certainly interfere
with the administration of justice."


"We deprecate this practice and caution the publisher, editor and the
journalist who are responsible for the said articles against indulging
in such trial by media when the issue is subjudiced," it said.

The Bench said: "others concerned in journalism would take note of
this displeasure expressed by us for interfering with the
administration of justice".


http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/001200502050302.htm




CHAT BY EXPERTS

GK2, New Delhi (19th October), the local mosque decided to wake everyone
up and began broadcasting at 4.30 AM, continuing until 5.10 AM. The same
story in many, Indian cities. Calcutta, which did not have this phenomenon
in the 1960s is now also awoken by this kind of Islamic belligerence
everywhere. It was declared illegal by the High Court on the grounds that it
was noise pollution and loudspeakers were not enjoined by Islamic law. A
fatwa was immediately declared calling for the murder of the judge. He and
his family had to go into hiding and the broadcasts continued. The WB
government then called a meeting of religious leaders (Hindus were not
invited) and made a plea to Sikhs and Christians not use loudspeakers or
ring Church bells during some hours of the day, which they accepted. The
Muslims refused. The WB government then pleaded with Muslims leaders that
loudspeakers not be used during the few weeks when the annual school
examinations took place in the city. This too was rejected. Once Muslims
constitute 20+% of a city or state it becomes theirs because they can
marshal votes or threaten to riot to veto any policy they don't like. Worth
remembering that they ruled India despite being fewer than 5% of the
population, by using brute force. The threat to riot is its contemporary
counterpart. This is what the so-called composite culture and secularism
mean in India today: Islamic rule.

QUOTE
Patna: Enraged over arrest of Imam (head priest) of a mosque near the Patna
High Court, angry people of the minority community today (Feb 4, 2005)
gheraoed Kotwali police station and blocked the busy Bailey Road demanding
his immediate release.Soon after the Patna High Court took serious exception
to the playing of a loudspeaker at a mosque near the court, the police went
to the mosque and picked up the Imam and three others after the Friday
prayers.The people initially objected to the police action, then assembled
at the Kotwali police station and sat on a dharna on the busy Bailey road.
UNQUOTE

Of course the judge, has immediately 'asked" for a transfer.....

Air Force Flies Into Network-Centric Airspace

By Robert K. Ackerman



February 2005

Every aircraft a communicator in future air warfare.

The U.S. Air Force is building on new capabilities tested in Afghanistan and Iraq with a push for networked operations that exceeds many of the dreams of air combat planners of only a few years ago. New warfighting technologies in the pipeline for years are being melded with advanced sensors, data processing and information systems to produce a networked force that increasingly resembles a multicellular organism working to be the dominant life form in its environment.

During the Cold War, U.S. Air Force doctrine of well-trained self-reliant pilots focusing on mission goals contrasted sharply with that of the Warsaw Pact, which was built around central control of air assets for virtually all aspects of air combat from the moment an aircraft’s wheels left the ground. Even though the Cold War is a fading memory, the self-reliance of U.S. pilots remains a cornerstone of air doctrine. However, the U.S. Air Force is becoming networked in a way that would turn Red Army flight controllers green with envy.

This networking is designed to give the pilot more power to focus on primary duties instead of sensor, weapon and mission activities. Improved datalinks will move information directly from other aircraft and sensors to airborne weapon systems. All assets, including large noncombat platforms, will serve as key nodes in this network. And, the long-sought synergy of human and machine will move closer to reality with real-time interaction between airborne pilots and nearby unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

The Air Force transition to network-centric operations comprises a broad range of programs with complex interrelationships, explains Lt. Gen. William T. “Tom” Hobbins, USAF, deputy chief of staff for warfighting integration. While each of these programs represents improvements in performance and capability, these network-centric pieces must fit properly for the Air Force to realize their advantages, he emphasizes. And, they each pose their own individual challenges to Air Force warfighting integrators.

The Defense Department-mandated transition from the Internet protocol (IP) IPv4 to IPv6 represents a technological challenge that affects almost everything the Air Force does, the general observes. The Air Force has established an IPv6 office within the Air Force Communications Agency to lead this migration effort for the service. This office complements the effort that is being led by the Defense Department. The Air Force Communications Agency has the ability to dynamically analyze a network for flaws such as bottlenecks, so the agency can model IPv6 technology in a network realm to predict the impact on the process of transitioning to that new protocol.

The Air Force has created an airborne network that will extend to the defensewide Global Information Grid (GIG). Establishing this network will involve adding considerably to some 700 existing platforms in a Link-16 environment.

Incorporating the Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) will allow the Air Force to become IP based, Gen. Hobbins says. He describes it as one of the three most important elements to achieve network-centric operations—the other two being the ability to share data and to provide assured service. With Link-16 being one of the key waveforms in JTRS, the airborne network will allow the Air Force to transition to an IP environment in the air and connect to the GIG across the globe.

Further ahead in this transition, the Air Force will implement its family of advanced beyond-line-of-sight terminals (FAB-T), which will provide satellite connectivity, and a version of the multipurpose common datalink. Large command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) aircraft will be able to receive 274 megabits per second of data, and this common datalink also will permit them to communicate with JTRS and Link-16.

“Now you have built a global information grid that has all the elements of moving data very quickly from ground to air to space—seamlessly,” the general observes looking ahead. “It will be a self-forming, self-healing global information grid.”

The general cites several challenges that must be overcome to enable this network to function properly. These include determining how to migrate waveforms onto radio platforms, how to integrate these platforms, how to format data according to standards, where data will be deposited and how to manage the network in terms of determining the size of the pipe that transmits the information versus the user’s requirement.

Platform integration can be complicated, and Gen. Hobbins cites the JTRS radio as an example. Connecting the new joint tactical radio to an aircraft antenna will enable the user to receive networked information, but that user cannot put that networked information on aircraft legacy displays without major hardware changes to the vehicle’s wiring and the displays. However, a small personal data assistant mounted on the pilot’s leg can serve as the genesis of a desktop that can be plugged directly into the radio. This would create an IP radio without the cost of refurbishing the aircraft, the general notes.

But, newer aircraft may mandate a higher level of integration. This might involve embedding advanced wiring and sensors that would automatically send information through the network as they present it to the pilot in the cockpit.

Of course these challenges become even greater when applied to a coalition environment. Gen. Hobbins notes that the Air Force also must determine how it is going to work its targeting tools, applications and mining agents in a collaborative environment.

The Air Force is developing the Theater Battle Operations Network Environment, or T-BONE. This is the follow-on core system in the Air Force’s air and space operations centers used to build and execute an air campaign plan. T-BONE will put all material on a single database and will migrate the data from Unix to a PC base. The data will be time-stamped and will have historical geospatial data for establishing coordinates. That single database will be aligned with U.S. message-text format major columnar headings, and this will allow allies—who have built to the same major headings—to access the data repository.

The JTRS radio has a wideband network as one of its waveforms, and this network will allow the rapid movement of voice, IP, imagery and other media on various frequency spectra with encryption, if necessary. A new version of this wideband network called tactical targeting network technology, or TTNT, has just been tested. It permits a limited wideband network with less than 100 participants to be extended to three times as many customers at greater distances. And, TTNT allows data to be transmitted at an average of 1.7 megabits per second from a platform moving at up to 4,000 knots, as opposed to a maximum speed of 900 knots on the conventional network. Gen. Hobbins notes that this ability to transmit data at high vehicle speeds is important for sensor-equipped missiles. The Air Force will continue to develop this waveform, which already has been tested successfully, as part of JTRS.

The recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq served as excellent proving grounds for many new capabilities. However, some of these capabilities only scratched the surface of their potential, and some of the technology fixes were less than ideal.

Gen. Hobbins relates that the Air Force used primitive machine-to-machine chat effectively for many operational aspects, but it must be improved for future operations. Battle damage assessment must be more timely with better verification sources.

The Roll-On Beyond-Line-of-Sight Enhancement (ROBE) equipment provided a datalink capability for larger airborne platforms such as tankers (see page 49). Satellite links proved invaluable but difficult for aircraft, so the Air Force used systems called FacePods on 20 aircraft. Consisting of Iridium satellite communications in pods, these systems permitted pilots to talk to ground personnel via telephone links in beyond-line-of-sight situations. These systems are being fielded now.

Other problems that arose include misidentified targets, loss of or lack of situational awareness, and insufficient communications or datalinks. Not all aircraft are datalink capable, the general notes. Recent exercises with the U.S. Army involved work to improve common situational awareness between the two services. One goal is to improve information exchange between the Air Force and Army Patriot missile batteries so that the two services see the same picture. Blue Force Tracking also is helping the Air Force identify ground targets, and work continues to improve situational awareness over the next hill. Link-16 will help with that problem, and interoperability will improve when both services deploy JTRS.

The general notes that the Air Force brings to battle sensors that deal with information operations and automatic targeting and tracking. It has built a theaterwide command and control ability to share instantaneous signals intelligence among large aircraft. These aircraft can geolocate a specific location on Earth and reach out and share data within seconds with other receivers to focus their sensors on the same spot. Smart data mining agents will help overlay data on intelligence information to determine any changes. However, these items run on different databases with varying security levels. So, sharing and exchanging become challenging, especially for ensuring that command centers can get all of the information seamlessly and horizontally, the general observes. The goal is to be able to share information without sharing aspects such as its origin and other classification characteristics.

The Air Force is looking at combining information from multiple intelligence sources such as tactical, operational and national assets to geolocate a target on the Earth. Gen. Hobbins offers that this effort, which is still in the test phase, will require tying the receiver sites together and ensuring that the sites can use smart intelligent agents for sorting through massive amounts of data for relay. A user dealing with imagery might be sorting through hundreds of images at once to find a specific set of pixels. A signals intelligence customer might be receiving different forms of this intelligence on varying types of systems that must be overlapped. Working with electronics intelligence might require sorting through reams of data that must match the other two types of intelligence.

For example, someone searching for a particular type of vehicle might be cued to its presence by a signal identifiable as coming from a radio that is unique to that vehicle. Or, signals intelligence could confirm the presence of a vehicle detected by imagery.

The T-BONE system also can play a role in this arena. An aircraft carrying a low-altitude navigation and targeting infrared for night (LANTIRN) pod might receive a message via T-BONE describing a target that has just been struck a few miles away from the aircraft’s position. The message would direct the aircraft to slew the LANTIRN sensor in the direction of the target to provide battle damage assessment and, if necessary, strike the target again. This message would go directly to the sensor to re-task it, and its information would be delivered directly to the shooter.

Much of the Air Force’s sensor network activity involves reducing the time for the sensor to find the target. One way is network-centric collaborative targeting, which would network large aircraft. For example, one such aircraft might receive a signal from the ground that generates an error ellipse 200 miles long and 10 miles wide. However, by sharing this with other sensors observing the same piece of information, that error ellipse can be honed to less than 50 meters in fewer than two minutes. The result is accurate coordinates that can be sent to the shooter for a good target strike.

Link-16 also will provide automatic mission data to the network. When a pilot strikes a target with a missile or bomb, the aircraft’s Link-16 system automatically will notify the air operations center of the weapon launch and provide the coordinates of the release point and the intended target.

Unmanned aerial vehicles will be providing more information to pilots. And, those pilots will be transmitting pictures directly to ground personnel. This will remove the need for the pilot to verbally describe a target to a ground controller.

“We don’t want to be so [information technology] IT-based that we forget about who the customer is—it’s the warfighter,” the general declares. “So, we want to focus on the airman, we want to focus on the commander, and that is basically where we are going.”

The most important C4ISR technologies on the Air Force’s wish list involve JTRS and IP connectivity. “We need to capitalize on industry’s expertise in the IP networking business, on how they manage their networks and enterprise information management,” the general says.

New technologies and methodologies will be needed to enable more information to flow on less bandwidth, he adds. “We cannot be bandwidth hogs.”

Networks and applications must be made smarter, which touches on the need for smart intelligent agents. They would be especially useful in mobile wireless environments with limited bandwidth, Gen. Hobbins notes.

Coalition information sharing in a network-centric environment is vital. The Adaptive Joint Communications Node, which will allow dissemination of red intelligence resources while processing and disseminating blue intelligence communications, is important. Gen. Hobbins cites the need for multiplexing, especially for controlling multiple UAVs with one operator. “We would like to launch four UAVs from one location using one person,” he states.

Reorganizing Operational Support for the Warfighter

In a major overhaul, the U.S. Air Force is consolidating three separate information-related organizations into one organization to handle what used to be known as the common information community. These three organizations—CIO (chief information officer), ILC (communications operations) and XI (warfighting integration)—originally were established as separate entities, explains Lt. Gen. William T. Hobbins, USAF, deputy chief of staff for warfighting integration.

“These three organizations came down successful paths to this point,” the general states, “but now our senior leaders see great potential, great synergy, in combining the three into one, so that we can be working together on how operational support comes to the warfighter.”

The XI was in charge of integration, the CIO office handled information exchanges, and day-to-day communications fell to the ILC. Where keeping these organizations separate had been thought to be the most efficient way of exploiting their capabilities, Air Force leadership now believes that they will perform better consolidated under a three-star general, Gen. Hobbins relates. This is especially true for functional disciplines such as logistics, finance and personnel.

The reconfiguration should take place some time in the spring.



Web Resources
Air Force Communications Agency: http://public.afca.af.mil
Air Force Electronic Systems Center: http://esc.hanscom.af.mil
Joint Tactical Radio System Program: http://jtrs.army.mil

US Air Force Distributed Common Ground Station

Foundation for ISR Transformation


Latest version of Air Force Distributed Common Ground Station will enable participants all over the network to be part of mission planning.

By W.L. Miller

The Air Force is working on an upgraded intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance system that backers see as a foundation for transformation within the broader ISR community.

The current system, made up of legacy components, is known as the Distributed Common Ground Station (DCGS). The program of the Electronics Systems Center, Air Force Materiel Command, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, reached a major evolutionary milestone when it became the focus of a significant upgrade initiated last fall.

DCGS is a globally dispersed, wide area network of fixed and mobile ground processing systems for ISR data collected from high-flying manned and unmanned aerial vehicles and satellites, of which Predator, Global Hawk and U-2 are the most familiar.

The main function of the system is to receive intelligence feeds from multiple sources at a common ground station. The data is then processed, stored, correlated, exploited and disseminated to Air Operations Centers (AOCs) to enable time-critical strikes.

The initial award to the Raytheon team for the Air Force work was for an estimated $161 million to deliver up to 29 upgraded DCGS systems to various Air Force locations between 2004 and 2009. The expenditure for the DCGS upgrade systems will likely increase over time, including requirements for Navy DCGS capabilities, which are also included in the projected scope of work.

DCGS has gone through many modifications, but the latest upgrade effort, known as Block 10.2, is the most significant. Proponents of DCGS speak of Block 10.2 as more than an evolutionary step in the maturing of integrated ISR systems. As the cornerstone, COTS-based, Air Force ISR processing system, DCGS is to be outfitted with some new and far-reaching capabilities, many of which are classified or sensitive.

“It’s a linchpin program,” said Morris Johnston, DCGS program manager for Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. “It will become the foundation for a new level of transformation within the ISR community.”

Joe Giroux of MITRE, who is the DCGS Block 10.2 principal engineer, stresses the interoperability demands of the new age of warfare. “Over the years, battle scenarios have become much more complex and require a lot more coordination among U.S. forces and our coalition partners,” Giroux said. “DCGS is a central system in that respect. Block 10.2 will make it possible for participants all over the network to be part of mission planning.”

Interoperable Architectures

Lieutenant Colonel Steve Wert, chief of information exploitation systems at ESC, emphasized the importance of what DCGS is and where it is headed.

“In DCGS, the Department of Defense and Office of the Secretary of Defense have an over-reaching program that sets joint strategy, standards and architecture,” he said. He pointed out that each service currently has a DCGS system, and all services are building these systems according to overriding standards and architectures that will achieve interoperability.

“While some interoperability exists today at the product level,” Wert continued, “in early 2003, the OSD defined a greater level of operability and the systems architectures needed for joint operability at an information level.”

There are currently five core or regional sites and multiple national sites where DCGS operations take place. “The DCGS concept involves a federation of core sites, forward operating locations, data relay sites and elements of Air Operations Centers,” Wert said. “About half the systems within an AOC are ISR-related. These elements are all networked, either through dedicated communications lines, a Wide Area Network, satellite transmissions or other means. The forward operating locations are re-deployable.”

Bringing DCGS to a new level of operational effectiveness is the job of Lieutenant Colonel Steve Zenishek, program manager for DCGS Block 10.2. “The real program emphasis is on formulating a net-centric architecture ensuring all appropriate sites will get the necessary information at the same time,” he said. “The new contract will expand the existing network to include new Air National Guard sites.”

Zenishek said he views DCGS in the context of the changing nature of battle. “We still do mission planning, and during the mission we scan large volumes of information. Fighting an enemy using the kind of actions typified in Afghanistan and Iraq—guerilla warfare, hit-and-run operations and ambush tactics, for example—is difficult. But sensor capabilities are being developed that will make that job easier.”

Targets in traditional wars are usually industrial facilities, massed armies, fixed facilities or weapon systems. DCGS will enable the military to better contend with moving targets, whether human or mechanized, Zenishek said. “The Block 10.2 improvements will let us field a net-centric enterprise with emphasis on building a greater time-sensitive targeting capability in the AOC. By putting the Block 10.2 architecture in place, we’ll be able to transmit information faster and get it to the users sooner.”

Success in DCGS means taking people out of the information-sharing loop, where computers can do the job better through machine-to-machine interfaces, Zenishek contended. “In Operation Iraqi Freedom [OIF], we identified fleeting targets in near real-time. So it’s possible with current systems to a point, but it involves a lot of human interaction. The DCGS upgrade will automate that process so that information sharing in real-time will become routine.”

Major Chuck Angus, Air Force DCGS sustainment system manager, agreed with that perspective. “The performance of the system in OIF provided many examples of how time-sensitive targeting capability was of benefit,” he said.

Angus added that he looks forward to an improved DCGS capability. “DCGS is an aging system, and Block 10.2 will bring in system capabilities that will definitely enhance the warfighter’s effectiveness.”

Intelligence and Imagery

DCGS evolved from two systems, of which the first was the U-2 high altitude surveillance aircraft and the intelligence acquisition systems associated with its mission that during the Cold War processed signal intelligence and imagery inputs. These key 1980s programs were the Tactical Reconnaissance Intelligence Ground System and Tactical Reconnaissance Exploitation and Dissemination System.

“In the early 1990s, these two legacy systems were consolidated into several sheltered systems and re-designated as the Contingency Airborne Reconnaissance System (CARS),” explained Dan Towers, Warner Robins liaison for ISR ground systems at ESC.

A CARS system was deployed to support Southwest Asia operations in the mid-1990s. To reduce airlift, deployment operations and manpower costs, the system relayed data back to the CONUS and exploited it at Langley AFB. This ability resulted in the “reachback” concept being created, and paved the way for today’s DCGS architecture.

The second point of origin for DCGS was the Joint Service Imagery Processing System (JSIPS), begun in 1987. JSIPS collected national intelligence information as well as tactical intelligence. It received inputs from various aircraft, including the U-2. This program continued into the mid-1990s, when each of the services began developing intelligence-gathering systems.

JSIPS was transformed to modernize the acquisition and processing of intelligence information by using COTS hardware and software. This design approach, the integration with other intelligence systems like CARS and a required set of DoD integration standards all combined to emerge as DCGS in 1998. The idea was to join many separately fielded systems, which handled many different pieces of the Air Force’s ISR mission.

One key limitation of these earlier systems was that they were point to point—that is, one theater or area of operations was linked to one processing site at one location. But DCGS evolution has essentially eliminated the one-to-one ratio of areas of operations and the sites supporting them. It has introduced a wide area network approach and a distributed intelligence capability with a potential to link about 30 worldwide sites representing five core locations and several remote bases. It has also made possible the distribution of support among many sites.

Web-Based Applications

The Raytheon-led team building DCGS Block 10.2 includes Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, General Dynamics and L-3.

“Every team member brings significant tools and skills to the program,” Raytheon’s Johnston said, pointing to such areas as multi-intelligence exploitation, sensor planning tools, foundational architecture, moving target indicator processing and exploitation, signals intelligence processing, situation awareness, image product library capabilities and the special interfaces necessary to link to the national intelligence community.

According to Johnston, work on DCGS Block 10.2 is well underway. The interim design review has been completed, and the final design review (FDR) was held this spring. Following the FDR, the system will be conducted in two build phases, culminating in full testing in the fourth quarter of 2004.

“The real essence of expanding DCGS,” Johnston said, “is the migration away from individual client-based legacy systems and the movement toward Web-based applications. It means making the warfighter not only as informed as possible, but also as safe as possible.

“DCGS Block 10.2 will be a radical architectural departure from how ISR has been done in the past,” he continued, as multiple ISR nodes are enabled to work together, displaying common information that quickens the warfighter’s response and puts munitions decisively on target. “Because DCGS information will be available to all DoD users, the long-term benefit of open architecture can’t be overstated. That means, in the future, the rapid and seamless addition of applications and technologies can quickly get into the field.”

For military and industrial teams, the conversion of DCGS legacy pieces to a unified, seamless net-centric program for the future will require intense technological activity over the next few years. The system will integrate some sophisticated new sensor inputs, which are now under development. While much of that information is sensitive, it is clear that there is a great deal of leading edge sensor development going on that will benefit systems like DCGS.

Wert offered this statement of the essence of DCGS: “The key to warfare is becoming more than air superiority. It is now information superiority. We have robust programs that collect ISR. The DCGS is key to fusing that information and bringing it forward to the warfighter for awareness, decision-making and targeting. That’s where the true value of DCGS lies—in total information superiority. With the startup of DCGS Block 10.2, we’re getting much closer to that goal.”

Swarming UAVs

Swarming UAVs


Navy project develops small unmanned vehicles able to operate in groups and cheap enough to be considered expendable.

By Harrison Donnelly



Naval engineers are honing in on their goal of developing a “swarm” of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with the capabilities needed to carry out key reconnaissance and other missions but at a cost low enough to make them effectively expendable.

The Smart Warfighting Array of Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM) UAV project at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division (NSWCCD), has already assembled a fleet of 10 lightweight units designed to be used in a cooperative fashion. Efforts are directed to maintain the low cost philosophy, which will result in a per vehicle production cost of $2,000.

Deborah A. Furey, SWARM UAV project manager at the Maryland research facility, summarized the undertaking this way: “These vehicles operate as a group, functioning together as a ‘swarm’ of aircraft. This operational model requires the vehicles to function as individual units while being a part of a larger functioning organization operating to achieve a common mission goal. The UAVs communicate relevant information and can reconfigure themselves, autonomously changing direction in response to sensor input to achieve the mission at hand.

“For example, if you have 100 aircraft collecting sensor input over a field of operation and five of them have engine failure or are shot out of the sky, the rest can reconfigure themselves to collect the required data and complete the mission,” Furey continued. “The important thing is that they are considered low-cost and expendable. The vehicles need to be low cost to support the swarming concept, where hundreds will fly together and where individual unit losses won’t significantly undermine the value of the total asset, both economically and militarily.”

In creating swarming aircraft, developers are not only exploring an ancient military tactic that is attracting increased attention from modern military theoreticians, but also filling out the UAV spectrum and giving new options to commanders for accomplishing missions while preserving lives and resources.

Swarming—defined as small, maneuverable fire units able to converge quickly from different directions on a common target—has a venerable military history. But some experts also see the approach as ideally suited to the age of information warfare, with two Rand Corp. researchers last year proposing the concept of the “battleswarm” based on networked maneuver units.

The application of swarm theory to unmanned vehicles has also attracted considerable interest among military researchers, who are intrigued by the idea of enabling groups of vehicles to sense and respond automatically, without having to be controlled individually by operators on the ground. The Office of Naval Research’s Autonomous Intelligent Networks and Systems project, for example, has conducted swarm-related research with small UAVs for surveillance operations in Iraq.

One important element to this aspect of swarm research lies in developing the most effective software routines needed to enable autonomous operations of the group, specifically the development of cooperative behavior algorithms. Other researchers continue to experiment with a variety of approaches, which include models based on potential fields and on pheromones, which are the chemicals secreted by ants and other insects to convey messages to others in their group.

Cost Crunching

The NSWCCD team, however, has focused less on complex control issues than on the practical aspects of designing an aircraft that can fly, be controlled and carry out military functions—and be produced for about the cost of a big-screen television. Indeed, according to former NSWCCD official and SWARM founder Vince Castelli, the $2,000 cost goal—roughly, about the price of an “expendable” Navy sonabouy—was always the most important aspect of the design process, around which limits on performance would have to be accepted.

Developers of the project, which is currently sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), also wanted to ensure the UAV could be easily used within a military environment and reconfigured to meet changing mission requirements.

“It’s a military aircraft in terms of the fuel it uses and its ability to be integrated into a field unit,” said Furey. “This aircraft was designed to be compatible with the military, and therefore is logistically easier to deploy with field units and existing military assets. For example, the weight of one aircraft is less than 20 pounds, so that one person can carry, assemble and launch it. The size is such that it can fit through a watertight door on a Navy ship. Its engine operates on JP-5 fuel, which is already in the field. This UAV was designed to be compatible with the existing military.”

The unit that emerged from the design process can be produced at the cost goal in large-scale production, developers predict. It has a takeoff weight of 18 pounds, which includes a four-pound payload of sensors or other equipment. In flight tests, it has stayed aloft for more than two and a half hours.

Key components of the UAV include:

• A thin-walled thermoplastic airframe that is light in weight and constructed to provide the needed structural rigidity.

• A 0.75 hp engine that operates on standard military fuel (JP-5/8) rather than highly volatile fuel used in model airplanes, which would have required its own supply chain and storage facilities.

• An onboard alternator that powers the on-board electronic equipment. A battery option is also available.

• An avionics unit with accelerometers, gyros and computers needed to fly the craft and determine its location through the Global Positioning Satellite system.

The full SWARM UAV concept calls for the development and implementation of low-cost surveillance and sensor systems. This follows the philosophy of expendability, in that the sensors and UAV would be a low-cost system that could be used and considered expendable.

In looking ahead to the potential uses of SWARM UAVs, Furey focused on the military intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance advantages of such low-cost aircraft.

“The swarming UAV concept is appropriate for many applications requiring data collection on both a large and small scale,” she said. “Several units can be used to survey and map a route for troop movements. Equipped with cameras, a formation of UAVs can fly over the desired route at a specific spacing and altitude to collect mapping information at the required resolution for path finding. Alternatively, for path monitoring, a pair of UAVs can accompany a convoy for force protection applications. The UAV would fly ahead of the convoy to monitor the path for safety.”

To be sure, many of these missions could also be carried out by existing UAVs, which are high-dollar assets and in high demand. But with an individual price goal of a fraction of current UAVs, these small, easy-to-use aircraft could be ideal for situations in which commanders did not want to risk scarce resources.

“The small size of these UAVs makes them available to the individual troop units. These systems can be assigned to small groups of soldiers, making the usefulness of UAVs accessible to all scales of missions. For example, foot soldiers in Afghanistan may need to get an immediate visual over the hill. Getting one of the currently fielded units, which are often in high demand, is not always feasible or cost effective. Instead, you can send a SWARM group or a single UAV,” Furey explained.

“These small, low-cost military UAVs offer a significant asset that can be used to further the capabilities of field units. In addition, this novel swarm technology may have applications with Navy ships at sea or law enforcement organizations such as the Border Patrol. Swarming technologies offer a new way to approach mission design, mission risk and mission requirements.”

Courtesy : Milllitary AeroSpace technology



"Jordanian Indigenous UAV Programs."

Please download the report.
http://www.special-operations-technology.com/UAV-SpecialReport.pdf

US considered "Aphrodisiac" as Biochemical Weapons

Aphrodisiac" Biochemical Weapons

US Air Force proposal


Sunshine Project Responds to Pentagon Statements on

"Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals"


(Austin, 17 January) - In the past several days, international media have focused attention on the US Air Force biochemical weapons proposal titled Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals. The document was submitted to the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate (JNLWD) in 1994. It was acquired by the Sunshine Project under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and posted on our website in late December.

At the same time in 1994, the US Army proposed developing a number of other drugs, principally narcotics, as "non-lethal" weapons. These documents were also obtained under FOIA and are posted on the Sunshine Project website.

Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals proposes development of a mind-altering aphrodisiac weapon for use by the US armed forces, as well as other biochemicals, including one that would render US enemies exceptionally sensitive to sunlight.

With respect to the Air Force proposal, the Department of Defense has recently been quoted as saying the following:

"[The proposal] was rejected out of hand."

DOD Spokesman Lt. Col Barry Venable to Reuters
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/6833083/

"It was not taken seriously. It was not considered for further development."

JNLWD spokesman Capt. Daniel McSweeney to the Boston Herald
http://news.bostonherald.com/national/view.bg?articleid=63615

These statements are untrue. The proposal was not rejected out of hand. It has received further consideration. In fact, it was recent Pentagon consideration, in 2000 and 2001, that brought this document to the Sunshine Project's attention and resulted in our FOIA request:

--> In 2000, the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate (JNLWD) prepared a promotional CD-ROM on its work. This CD-ROM, which was distributed to other US military and government agencies in an effort to spur further development of "non-lethal" weapons, contained the Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals document. If the proposal had been rejected out of hand and not taken seriously, it would not have been placed in JNLWD's publication.

--> Similarly, in 2001, JNLWD commissioned a study of "non-lethal" weapons by the National Academies of Science (NAS). JNLWD provided information on proposed weapons systems for assessment by an NAS scientific panel. Among the proposals that JNLWD submitted to the NAS for consideration by the nation's pre-eminent scientific advisory organization was Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals.

(Click here to see a partial list of documents deposited at NAS and/or contained on the JNLWD CD-ROM.)

Thus, the Pentagon's statements (as quoted in news reports) are inaccurate and should be corrected.

While the Sunshine Project does not have evidence suggesting that Harassing, Annoying, and 'Bad Guy' Identifying Chemicals has been funded, US Army proposals to weaponize narcotics that were made at the time have moved forward. These include proposals such as Antipersonnel Calmative Agents and for development of opiate and sedative biochemical weapons. Those proposals are discussed in detail in the Sunshine Project news release "The Return of ARCAD" available at the URL:

http://www.sunshine-project.org/publications/pr/pr060104.html

According to Sunshine Project Director Edward Hammond: "What the Pentagon's reaction shows is the biochemical dependency problem of the DOD 'non-lethal' weapons program. JNLWD has never divorced itself from biochemical weapons, and when confronted with that fact, it goes into denial. The denials are contradicted by DOD's own records. The fact of the matter is that Pentagon continues to pursue biochemical weapons, perhaps including those proposed by the Air Force, but certainly including those proposed by the Army."

Crisis in Balochistan

Balochistan: Several Blasts in Kohlu and Turbat, tension in Sui

Senate: After 3 days debate in senate, cantonments to be built in Balochistan


Report: Views of an ex bureaucrat on the situation in Balochistan

UNREST IN GILGIT-BALTISTAN

by B.Raman

(Paper prepared for presentation at a seminar on India's Himalayan
Frontiers at the School of International Studies of the Jawaharlal Nehru
University, New Delhi, on February 5, 2005)

While the current freedom struggle launched by the Baloch nationalists
in Balochistan has received the attention of the international
community, similar attention has not been paid to the growing unrest in the
Gilgit-Baltistan area of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K), which has been under
Pakistani occupation since 1948. While the Pakistani authorities refer to
this area as the Northern Areas of Pakistan, the local nationalists,
who have launched a separatist struggle, call it by its historical name
of Balawaristan. Click to read more

Goa Governor Jamir must go

Title: Jamir must go
Author: Editorial

Publication: Free Press Journal

Date: February 4, 2005

http://www.samachar.com/features/040205-editorial.html

The pity is they wouldn't dismiss the Governor of Goa for his
atrocious assault on the Constitution of India. Indeed, craven Congressmen
in the State and their masters in New Delhi might well be vying with
one another to felicitate S. C. Jamir for having dismissed the Manohar
Parrikar Government only a few minutes after it had established its
wafer-thin majority on the floor of the House, albeit in somewhat
controversial circumstances.

Politician Jamir, clearly, had not still graduated to being
Governor Jamir though he had duly acquired the trappings of that high office
after being sworn in `to protect and uphold the Constitution of India.'
Protect and uphold the Constitution he certainly did not do when in a
nocturnal coup late on Wednesday he not only dismissed the BJP-led
Government but, which was far worse, he duly installed a Congress Party
Government in its place.

Now, if Governor Jamir thought he had earned for himself a
promotion to the Raj Bhawan in Lucknow, he wouldn't be wrong. Once there, he
can repeat his ugly feat against the Mulayam Singh Government and
install a puppet government in its place and thus earn the eternal gratitude
of the Family for having paved the way for its return in the country's
largest State.

After the atrocity against the Constitution in Goa we trust
everyone has got the answer to the question as to why the great Shivjraj
Patil, Home Minister of India, no less, had previously dismissed the
Governors appointed by the Vajpayee Government. It pays to have puppets in
the Raj Bhawans, isn't it?

Admittedly, the Parrikar Government was in dire straits once it
got rid of a minister who was facing charges of corruption for
indiscriminately converting agriculture land into commercial for monetary
considerations. Upon his dismissal, the Independent legislator teamed up with
the opposition Congress Party, leading to the chain of events
culminating in the wholly unwarranted dismissal of the Parrikar Government.

Several constitutional experts have unequivocally condemned the
Governor's action, though it is unlikely that it would persuade Patil to
propose his removal. The floor of the House, numbers without time
higher courts have asserted, remains the only valid forum for testing the
majority, or the lack of it, of a government. But Jamir was innocent of
such basic information impinging on his gubernatorial duties and went
ahead to dismiss the Parrikar Government even after it had proved its
majority.

But having done that he did not stop there. He installed Pratap
Singh Rane as the new CM and the MLA who was disqualified by the Speaker
as his deputy. Nearly two decades ago, the Congress Party had dismissed
the NTR Government in somewhat similar circumstances, leading to a
chain of events which eventually led to the party's eclipse in large parts
of the country. For, the democratic game cannot be played without some
basic rules. And if the referee, in this case the Governor, joins one
team against the other, it can bring the whole game into disrepute.
Therefore, Jamir must go.




Goa trust vote : 'Jamir' exceeded his brief
Report by Prashant Hamine

Mumbai



The stunning action of Goa Governor S C Jamir in dismissing the BJP
government led by CM Manohar Parrikar which had won the trust vote in the
State Assembly on February 2 is being described by the legal experts
here as a case of one mistake being c omitted to rectify the earlier
mistakes. Leader of Opposition in the Maharashtra Legislative assembly,
Narayan Rane on Thursday described the turn of events as a
broad-daylight murder of democracy.



A legal expert on conditions of anonymity remarked that the Goa
Governor cannot interpret or overrule the final outcome of the Trust Vote in
the Assembly. He argued that whatever the actions of the Goa Assembly
Speaker, Vishwas Satarkar would have been in taking action against
Philip Neri Rodrigues, (Independent), there is no legal provision in the
Constitution which can challenge the speaker's decision taken on the floor
of the House.



A case I point here was the suspension of membership of seven MLAs by
the then Maharashtra Legislative Assembly Speaker, Arun Gujarathi on
June 13, 2002. The speaker then had suspended five NCP MLAs. The SC later
had restored their membership sans their voting rights. On June 13,
2002, during the one day special session of the Maharashtra Legislative
Assembly, the agenda before the house had stated thus this legislature
express full trust in the cabinet by CM Vilasrao Deshmukh. The then CM
had won the trust vote with 143 MLAs in favour and 133 against. .



According to article 212 of the Constitution the validity of any
proceeding in the Legislature of a State shall be called in question on the
ground of any alleged irregularity of procedure. It very clearly states
that the Presiding Officer of the Legislature of a state shall not be
subject to the jurisdiction of any court in respect of the exercise by
him of the powers vested in him b y the Constitution.



He Provisions of article 356 lay down that 'even if the Governor at any
time entertains doubts as the sitting Ministry's command over the
majority in the Assembly, he shall call the leader of the opposition to test
the majority. He cannot dismiss the sitting ministry only upon his
personal estimate.'



About article 164, SC observation in a related case of Mahabir vs
Praful Kumar Mohanta of 1969 had observed that whenever the Governor
entertains any doubt of majority in the sitting Ministry he should call the
Leader of Opposition to test the majority.



Experts add that it is only when the Leader of the House (CM) declines
to have a trust vote can the Governor step in to dismiss the incumbent
ministry. Here the Parrikar government had won the trust vote
how-so-ever controversial the circumstances in which the trust vote was won.
Experts say that the CM Parrikar had at no point of time, refused to under
the trust vote.

..

Besides, sources said that resignations of any MLA has to be submitted
to the Speaker first. Here the rebel members had handed over the
resignations to the Governor himself.



.

Legal experts term the dismissal of the Parrikar government as the
first unique case in the history of Parliamentary democracy in the country.
They point out that in the dismissal of S R Bommai government in
Karnataka , the governor had not only dismissed the incumbent government,
but also dissolved the legislature. In the landmark case the SC had not
only revived the dissolved assembly but also restored the elected
government.

Tarun Bharat in its edit had given the simile of Lady Macbeth's hand
which was described 'All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten these
little hands'.

Goa government had controlled corruption and progress and development
of the state was going ahead hand in hand. If the things go the way they
were, BJP will be popular in Goa and Congress will be decimated was the
fear of the leaders of the Congress and hence this step has been taken.
Sarkaria Commission had recommended that the majority of any government
should be decided on the floor of the assembly and SC had also given
its verdict on the same lines in the case of Nagaland.

Goa Governor Jamir must go

Title: Jamir must go
Author: Editorial

Publication: Free Press Journal

Date: February 4, 2005

http://www.samachar.com/features/040205-editorial.html

The pity is they wouldn't dismiss the Governor of Goa for his
atrocious assault on the Constitution of India. Indeed, craven Congressmen
in the State and their masters in New Delhi might well be vying with
one another to felicitate S. C. Jamir for having dismissed the Manohar
Parrikar Government only a few minutes after it had established its
wafer-thin majority on the floor of the House, albeit in somewhat
controversial circumstances.

Politician Jamir, clearly, had not still graduated to being
Governor Jamir though he had duly acquired the trappings of that high office
after being sworn in `to protect and uphold the Constitution of India.'
Protect and uphold the Constitution he certainly did not do when in a
nocturnal coup late on Wednesday he not only dismissed the BJP-led
Government but, which was far worse, he duly installed a Congress Party
Government in its place.

Now, if Governor Jamir thought he had earned for himself a
promotion to the Raj Bhawan in Lucknow, he wouldn't be wrong. Once there, he
can repeat his ugly feat against the Mulayam Singh Government and
install a puppet government in its place and thus earn the eternal gratitude
of the Family for having paved the way for its return in the country's
largest State.

After the atrocity against the Constitution in Goa we trust
everyone has got the answer to the question as to why the great Shivjraj
Patil, Home Minister of India, no less, had previously dismissed the
Governors appointed by the Vajpayee Government. It pays to have puppets in
the Raj Bhawans, isn't it?

Admittedly, the Parrikar Government was in dire straits once it
got rid of a minister who was facing charges of corruption for
indiscriminately converting agriculture land into commercial for monetary
considerations. Upon his dismissal, the Independent legislator teamed up with
the opposition Congress Party, leading to the chain of events
culminating in the wholly unwarranted dismissal of the Parrikar Government.

Several constitutional experts have unequivocally condemned the
Governor's action, though it is unlikely that it would persuade Patil to
propose his removal. The floor of the House, numbers without time
higher courts have asserted, remains the only valid forum for testing the
majority, or the lack of it, of a government. But Jamir was innocent of
such basic information impinging on his gubernatorial duties and went
ahead to dismiss the Parrikar Government even after it had proved its
majority.

But having done that he did not stop there. He installed Pratap
Singh Rane as the new CM and the MLA who was disqualified by the Speaker
as his deputy. Nearly two decades ago, the Congress Party had dismissed
the NTR Government in somewhat similar circumstances, leading to a
chain of events which eventually led to the party's eclipse in large parts
of the country. For, the democratic game cannot be played without some
basic rules. And if the referee, in this case the Governor, joins one
team against the other, it can bring the whole game into disrepute.
Therefore, Jamir must go.




Goa trust vote : 'Jamir' exceeded his brief
Report by Prashant Hamine

Mumbai



The stunning action of Goa Governor S C Jamir in dismissing the BJP
government led by CM Manohar Parrikar which had won the trust vote in the
State Assembly on February 2 is being described by the legal experts
here as a case of one mistake being c omitted to rectify the earlier
mistakes. Leader of Opposition in the Maharashtra Legislative assembly,
Narayan Rane on Thursday described the turn of events as a
broad-daylight murder of democracy.



A legal expert on conditions of anonymity remarked that the Goa
Governor cannot interpret or overrule the final outcome of the Trust Vote in
the Assembly. He argued that whatever the actions of the Goa Assembly
Speaker, Vishwas Satarkar would have been in taking action against
Philip Neri Rodrigues, (Independent), there is no legal provision in the
Constitution which can challenge the speaker's decision taken on the floor
of the House.



A case I point here was the suspension of membership of seven MLAs by
the then Maharashtra Legislative Assembly Speaker, Arun Gujarathi on
June 13, 2002. The speaker then had suspended five NCP MLAs. The SC later
had restored their membership sans their voting rights. On June 13,
2002, during the one day special session of the Maharashtra Legislative
Assembly, the agenda before the house had stated thus this legislature
express full trust in the cabinet by CM Vilasrao Deshmukh. The then CM
had won the trust vote with 143 MLAs in favour and 133 against. .



According to article 212 of the Constitution the validity of any
proceeding in the Legislature of a State shall be called in question on the
ground of any alleged irregularity of procedure. It very clearly states
that the Presiding Officer of the Legislature of a state shall not be
subject to the jurisdiction of any court in respect of the exercise by
him of the powers vested in him b y the Constitution.



He Provisions of article 356 lay down that 'even if the Governor at any
time entertains doubts as the sitting Ministry's command over the
majority in the Assembly, he shall call the leader of the opposition to test
the majority. He cannot dismiss the sitting ministry only upon his
personal estimate.'



About article 164, SC observation in a related case of Mahabir vs
Praful Kumar Mohanta of 1969 had observed that whenever the Governor
entertains any doubt of majority in the sitting Ministry he should call the
Leader of Opposition to test the majority.



Experts add that it is only when the Leader of the House (CM) declines
to have a trust vote can the Governor step in to dismiss the incumbent
ministry. Here the Parrikar government had won the trust vote
how-so-ever controversial the circumstances in which the trust vote was won.
Experts say that the CM Parrikar had at no point of time, refused to under
the trust vote.

..

Besides, sources said that resignations of any MLA has to be submitted
to the Speaker first. Here the rebel members had handed over the
resignations to the Governor himself.



.

Legal experts term the dismissal of the Parrikar government as the
first unique case in the history of Parliamentary democracy in the country.
They point out that in the dismissal of S R Bommai government in
Karnataka , the governor had not only dismissed the incumbent government,
but also dissolved the legislature. In the landmark case the SC had not
only revived the dissolved assembly but also restored the elected
government.

Tarun Bharat in its edit had given the simile of Lady Macbeth's hand
which was described 'All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten these
little hands'.

Goa government had controlled corruption and progress and development
of the state was going ahead hand in hand. If the things go the way they
were, BJP will be popular in Goa and Congress will be decimated was the
fear of the leaders of the Congress and hence this step has been taken.
Sarkaria Commission had recommended that the majority of any government
should be decided on the floor of the assembly and SC had also given
its verdict on the same lines in the case of Nagaland.

We are planning Beslan-type operations in the future

Interview of Shamil Basayev to Channel 4 News (http://kavkazcenter.com/eng/)


Answering questions of Channel 4 News


First question: The aim of our operation in Beslan was to stop the war, stop the genocide of the Chechen people, and withdraw the Russian occupying troops. The results achieved in Budennovsk were not reached because unlike that time the Russians were prepared for the operation, although in both cases the officers and soldiers and methods were practically the same.



Paraphrase: (many storms at Budennovsk, 6 Ѕ hours non-stop, only stopped for new ammunition, 130 people killed. More than 100 people civilians killed in the storm…



Only difference that in Beslan more ammunition and more powerful



But also then more or less free press that could effect public opinion.



When the choice was to stop or to destroy the hospital with people inside they had to stop because their every step was being watched by the press and the whole world.



Said at Budennovsk not to kill but to stop the war)



We came there not to kill people but to stop the war, and if it works out that way to force the Russian leadership to kill its own civilians, if only through this to force the lying and vain world to understand what is really going on, to lay bare our wound and pain, because people don’t see what is happening in Chechnya. They see it only when huge actions like this one occur on the territory of Russia itself.



To be honest I didn’t plan Beslan. We planned the operation in Moscow or Leningrad, and wanted if we could to carry it out even in two places simultaneously. But the lack of finances didn’t allow us to plan that operation in the centre of Russia. So we chose Ossetia, because Ossetia is Russia’s fortpost in the North Caucasus, and all bad that comes to us comes from the territory of Ossetia, with the silent consent of its population. We’re also not delighted by what happened there. To be honest I am even shocked by what happened there, and am still in a state of shock after it because I didn’t expect that cruelty from the Russian leadership. I thought that if we work through all options, if we don’t leave the Russian leadership with a single chance for a bloodless resolution of this problem, they won’t kill children. This is what I thought and you can say I was cruelly wrong.



Putin opted to do this because the hypocritical West supports the slaughter of the Chechen people, the genocide of the Chechen people.



So we are forced to choose these methods in order to try somehow to stop by any means possible the genocide of our people.



I also have a principle of «the worse, the better», because always difficulty is followed by ease, and the harder it is for us today, the faster this relief will come, the faster victory will come. We are laying naked bare nerves, and forcing the whole world to remember that there is still a war in Chechnya, although Putin lies and claims there is none.



Second question: Reasonable people all over the world condemn the cruelty of the Russian army, but how few there are such people in the world. Thousands yes, but not a million.



The whole world is sick through Russian propaganda. I said at the beginning that in Budennovsk Russia used the same methods, and the only difference is in Budennovsk they practically used few flame-throwers.



But in Beslan they destroyed the school using flame-throwers. Most people died there not from our mines but as a result of the Special Forces storm. The whole world today is horrified and asks how could they have used flame-throwers to fire at a school with children inside, using tens of flame-throwers. The fire, the collapse of the roof, it all happened because the special forces used flame-throwers to fire at the building.



And the special forces wonder at what happened. In this we see an advantage for Chechnya because if in Chechnya all the time these weapons are used in villages, mop-up operations, in Ingushetia and Dagestan and all the world can see this and they’re banned by conventions that Russia has signed but here the world was horrified as though it happened for the first time. So now in clean-up operations they use them less… so here an advantage.



We have not stopped directing our operations against military and political targets on Russian territory. It’s just that your knowledge and our capability to conduct military action are limited. Today everywhere access to freedom of information, free spread of information are barred to us, because any journalist who asks us anything is automatically an accomplice of terrorism or something else. We have had this badge of terrorism hang on us, although as you can see I am conducting anti-terror. Terrorism is conducted by the Russian leadership, and this is state terrorism.



The less access we have to information, the more they close access to the mass media from us to report on events, the more cruel our actions and those of the Russian power structures become.

As for action against military and political targets. The whole world today sees only planes exploding, bombs in Moscow and Beslan. Other than that the world sees practically nothing. In the past year in Chechnya we have conducted more than 15 large-scale operations, in which more than 200 or 300 people have participated at once. We conducted more than 15 operations this spring and summer, and if you count political [targets], the destruction of the leadership of the puppet regime of Kadyrov on May 9, and that was also counted as a terrorist act although it was a military operation, [as was] taking Ingushetia, taking by storm, an operation in Kabardino-Balkaria, where we seized a very large amount or weapons, including this six-barrelled grenade launcher. This was a present from the Kabardinian government for us. We also seized more than 200 weapons, revolvers, heavy machine-guns, about 100 machine-guns and a lot more besides of weaponry and technical implements.



The operation in Ingushetia was the only [operation] to receive coverage because of its effect. But there were also another four operations involving more than 300 people. One was conducted in Avtury and Geldali, in the Kurchaloi district of Chechnya partly in Vedeno. The second operation was in July, the 12 and 13 July, then on August 22 we had an operation in Grozny where again about 300 Mujahideen were involved. This again was just the force in Grozny



For example in the Grozny operation I personally awarded from our trophy weapons 51 people with reusable grenade launchers, and 462 grenades for them. Most of them were fired, and about 80 enemy soldiers and national scum, and more than 50 pieces of military hardware were destroyed, including 6-7 armoured vehicles. In September a special operation was conducted in the Kurchaloy region towards Gudermes, in several villages, where again about 300 Mujahideen took part. There too national traitors were destroyed, many of them, from the Kadyrov rabble. But this too is not reported. This summer was marked too by particularly low losses on our side.



This we also see as a celebration of the most high, because in the Ingush operation we had only 2 shaheeds (martyrs), glory to Allah, in the Grozny operation we didn’t have a single death, although after the battle as we were withdrawing from the town we has two shaheeds, and that was because of their slovenliness. In the Avturi operation we had only one shaheed, although we captured 12 and destroyed more than 60 national scum and Russian occupiers. This doesn’t count many explosions and attacks, isolated or in groups. This summer, spring and autumn were very fruitful for us, but we didn’t have the opportunity to show, to film military operations and so on. It’s just that we have very little financial resources, we have difficulties, and we aren’t able to buy equipment, video equipment, like we used to. So we report little.



So it looks like in a year we just conducted the one Beslan operation, but thanks to the grace of Allah operations beyond the Republic are conducted only by our brigade of shaheeds. But apart from us there are several thousand Mujahideen in the Republic and around, throughout the North Caucasus. The Russians try to give the impression that only our brigade of shaheeds is fighting and there is no-one else. But that is not true. Again I say that apart from us there are several groups of Mujahideen in the forests, in the mountains, in the towns and in the villages, actively fighting. The operations that we conducted this year were joint between the shaheed with other groups of Mujahideen.



Today the attitude of the international community, particularly in the West, to the situation in Chechnya .. I would characterise in no way. I am reminded of a parable of DzhuAn See, the great Chinese sage. An eagle with a 10-metre wingspan flew into the sky, and in a little puddle a toad sat. When the eagle flew over an enormous shadow covered the toad from the sun, and this little frog quacked to scare away the eagle. I hope the international community isn’t offended, but the international community reminds me of this frog. If the eagle flies they’ll say we quacked, we were worried for you, but if it hovers they’ll quietly quack and do nothing.



This summer’s operations on the contrary increased the chance, and the pressure by the West on Putin has increased, whether the West wants or not. But today we have the situation that we all depend on each other, and the world has become closer than ever, and technology allows one person to wage war against an entire state.



Today the whole world depends on each other, and what is happening in Chechnya returns to Russia like a boomerang, and if this spiral isn’t stopped it will spread further. It will touch both Europe and the whole world, because evil that is born must be stopped; stopped by all force. I have said many times that Putin is a revanchist, and that Russism is an ideology worse than fascism. Putin’s activity now reminds one of the Munich Agreement of 1938.



The West closes its eyes on the disgrace created by Russia. Putin and his clique are revanchists who dream of the rebirth of the Soviet empire. And Russia today is not a federation, it’s an empire, and its echoes. Russia is a country of slaves, a country of masters, as her own great poets said. In Russia there is no faith in anything. It wasn’t me, but the great Winston Churchill who said that any paper signed by Russians is worth no more than the paper it’s written on. That wasn’t me or Chechens who said that, but your British Prime Minister. They are the same as they were before. They destroyed our people before and they’re destroying it today, but today they’re attempting to destroy us with our own hands. There are enough national traitors in any people, and today in order to pin all their brutality on us they’re creating in Chechnya an inter-Chechen conflict. They want to transfer their brutality, the murder of more than 250,000 of our people, in order for us to fight a civil war.



We actively brought military operations to the territory of Russia only in 2002, at precisely the time when they began to conduct the Chechenisation of the conflict. Chechenisation of the conflict will never work and civil war will never work because civil war occurs in a free state when free citizens fight. Today we are fighting with lackeys, with the slaves of the Russian Empire, their pawns. They are not citizens of the Chechen Republic, they are citizens of Russia are her slaves.



We are planning Beslan-type operations in the future because we are forced to do so. Today our citizens are disappearing. If you take for example less than a week ago on the Dagestan-Azerbaijan border they caught a girl with a child and through threats to the child they forced her to confess that she is a shaheed and was travelling somewhere to do something, I don’t know. There are many examples of when young girls .. when something happens to 16- or 17-year old girls the Russians call them children, but our 11, 12 or 13-year old girls they say are being prepared as terrorists. I don’t understand how you can recruit 12-year old girls as a shaheed. Under this pretext our girls disappear without a trace.



They can take anyone, all the more so now when entire families disappear. In order to stop this chaos we have to respond in the same way.



Of course now many try to say, particularly in the Russian leadership, that look, civilians, peaceful innocent people. But you must understand us correctly. We are at war and we look at the form, the form, and not at whether the population has weapons in their hands. We look at the form of their participation in this war. People who approve of Putin’s policies, people who pay their taxes for this war, people who send their soldiers to this war, priests who sprinkle holy water on them, who bless their holy duty – this is what they say, they are the heroic defenders of the fatherland – but we are the 'terrorists' defending our motherland. How can they be innocent? They are just without weapons. Russian citizens are accomplices of this war, it just may be that they have no weapons in their hands. They are not peaceful people for us. Peaceful people for us are those that don’t pay taxes for this war, people who don’t participate, and who speak against this war. Only these are peaceful citizens for us.



Cynical though it may look, we are planning these operations, and we will conduct them, if only to show the world again and again the true face of the Russian regime, the true face of Putin with his Satanic horns, so that the world sees his true face. And the most important reason is to stop the genocide of the Chechen people, and to stop the bloody slaughter that is raging in our land. And in order to stop this genocide we won’t stop before anything.



With the grace of Allah we have not only the support of the Chechen people but of all the peoples of the North Caucasus, and throughout Russian territory. This is demonstrated if only by the fact that this war, this cruel battle has already been going for six years, and they cannot do anything with us. Over this time I have been many times in may republics of the North Caucasus, not only in Chechnya. For example this year in January I was in Chechnya, in February I was in Ingushetia and then in Ossetia, in Kabardino. In March I was in the Stavropol region and the Krasnodar region – there we even had a fire-fight but that wasn’t reported because it wasn’t expedient to report that I had been there. At the end of March I was in Ingushetia, and was there till the middle of April. In April I was again in Chechnya, had a couple of meetings, met Mujahideen. At the start of May I was again in Ingushetia. There in July, in June we planned the operation.



Three days after the operation I was already at the other end of Chechnya in the Vedeno region, then in the Kurchaloy region, and there I met Maskhadov, and spent two or three weeks there together. There we conducted a big operation, three days later I was in Grozny where I spent a month, and on August 23-24th I went again to Ingushetia, and from there to Ossetia. So I travel freely everywhere, to the grace of Allah, and that shows the support of not only our people, but of all kind people. The situation here is not what the Russian leadership tries to show the whole world. Ordinary people everywhere support us, and everywhere sympathise and help, to the grace of Allah. Without faith and the support of our people we would not have lasted a month against this armada, this huge enemy horde. To be honest I would not have stood against that force, because I think of myself as a pragmatic, sensible person, and I do not fight just out of idleness.



Everyone ask us, everywhere, everyone is interested in the participation of the resistance foreigners and in particular Arabs. On that question I’d also like to say that to be honest I am fed up with listening again and again to the same questions. But I’ll answer. In all times any army, any side considered volunteers a good thing and sign of right. Why is it that on the Russian side people don’t go and fight from all over the world, if only because we represent this universal evil that the West advertises us as?



Why is it that people from all over the world buy with their last kopek a ticket by hook or by crook to come and help us? I can assure you that we are not only helped by Muslims from all the world, but we are helped by people of different confessions – Christians, and I even have a good acquaintance who is Judaic and helps us. It is just that today the whole world is stupefied by infectious propaganda. In this war I have counted volunteers from more than 150 countries, including from Great Britain. I have a data base of about 1 Ѕ million volunteers from the whole world who want to come to us, perhaps there are now more – we haven’t been continuing counting for over a year. And of course we also have a million Chechens in our reserve, because we are supported by the whole people, and if somewhere on the television people are shown, that is people trying to survive.



Even the national traitors will at any time help us and do what they have to, because they have no choice, because most of them are serving the Russians only to survive. And the other part are fishing in these murky waters in order to earn as much money as they can.



If we talk about percentages, in the regular Mujahid there are about as many foreigners as there are in the British army – for example the Nepalese. No more, perhaps even less than the percentage you have.



The future relations between the Chechen Ichkeria Republic and Russia I see as good, god-willing. Although to be honest in the future I don’t see an entity such as the Russian Federation, because in the current politics of the leadership of Russia this splinter of the Soviet Empire will soon god-willing collapse into small small pieces. We are lending our efforts to these ends, in order to rid the whole world of this infection, of this horror.



We are fighting not because we have nothing to do or we like war. No, we don’t like – we also want to lead a calm life, live by our religion and laws, hinder no-one. But today the Russians are creating the situation where we are as though thirsting the blood of others. This is all very similar to a Krylov fable. Even if you look at the photos that were shown over the whole world, of the decapitated heads of those four British telecom workers.



The whole world blamed that on Barayev and the Akhmadovs, the whole world showed this, particularly the Russians, in order to show how cruel the Chechens are and so on. In fact both Baraev and Akhmadov had distant and indirect relations to this. These Britons were kidnapped by a completely different person, and their heads were cut off also by completely different people. In fact one of those who took part in the murder of these telecom workers, in their decapitation, is currently the head of the district department of the Interior Ministry of the Urus-Martan district of the puppet regime in Chechnya. The question is, don’t they know this? Today this person is at work in the power structures.



These Britons were kidnapped by Apti Abitayev from Urus-Martan. He died in the war. With him in the kidnapping and killing was this Ruslan Dzhamalkhan. He is now as I said the chief of police of the Urus-Martan district. He is particularly close to Ramzan Kadyrov.



There is a GRU battalion in the west of Chechnya, and its commander is Said-Magomed Kakiyo. He and his deputy, Aslan Magomadov, they killed the American in Moscow over the Radisson Slavyanskaya, on the order of Umar Dzhabrailov. They are his in-house assassins. And to this day their accounts are open. They also participated in the attempted assassination in this war of the vice-Premier of Moscow – Ordzhonokidze is his name, I think.



This man is also decorated as a Hero of Russia, he is the commander of a GRU battalion. We have another GRU commander in the east, Sulim Yamadayev. Before the war they were involved in kidnapping, seizing mostly Dagestanis and Ingush, and the result of this war is for our brother neighbours to turn from us through this kidnapping, cruelty and stealing. All of this was done for that reason. Sulim Yamudayev’s brother is now in prison in Russia, and was sentenced to tens of years. He was an assassin in Moscow, and he is kept at the moment as a bate. His brother Dzhabrail, who we destroyed in the spring, also a Hero of Russia, posthumously, he was also before the war and in the first was in Moscow an assassin, a hired murderer.



This special group is made up of these people. There is also Moldi Baisarov, also a battalion commander who serves in security for Kadyrov. He took part in the kidnapping of the son of the Ossetian Vice-Premier, they kidnapped the Vice-Premier’s son, and killed two FSB agents there. They also kidnapped another priest, two Jews, two journalists, one Arab businessman who they kidnapped in 1999 and according to my information he is still in their hands and alive. With him, with the Ossetian Vice-Premier’s son they also kidnapped a Bildurov from Sernovodsk. He is also now an FSB officer. His brother is now the special Chechen representative to Chechnya. These are the people who occupy these posts.



There is also Apti Abubakar, alias Richard, who is Baisarov’s deputy, the battalion commander. He was involved in the kidnapping of Vlasov and Shpigun, and in the killing of Russian POWs. On camera he is next to the so-called Tractorist. But that person is also bringing order in Chechnya today. These are the people who earlier created lawlessness here. There were a lot of such groups, and I can provide tens and tens of such examples, if not hundreds.



[Paraphrase: In the period of so-called independence Russia was still waging a covert war.

Claims that most of the kidnapping in these years was done to earn money for the Russian leadership – Chechens only got 10% of the money…]



I am ready to answer before a court for my actions, for my every step, because everyone should be equal before justice regardless of authority they hold, and of their position. Regardless of whether this helps bring peace to Chechnya or not, justice must be justice.



I met Maskhadov in November, and we spent the last ten days of Ramadan together. We fasted together and talked a lot. To all of Maskhadov’s accusations I answered and asked him .. I told him that I was ready to stand before a Shariah court, and answer to it in all its severity if it judges I should be punished.

But I asked him how in the conditions of an occupation and of war whether a court would be able to gather enough witnesses, question them, cross-examine on the accusations, question me and my defence: is he capable of this? And if today our court isn’t able to gather in full how can it judge me? Isn’t it better for him to wait with this court till the end of the war?



If Maskhadov isn’t able today to guarantee a decent investigation, today I think that there is no need to talk very much about it. He committed me to court and the court accepted it to consider, but today the court isn’t able [to function]. If the Russians withdraw their troops and cease the genocide of our people, I am ready to stand before a court, and I will accept any decision of the court with due deference, because I am fighting not for my personal enrichment or still more my personal pleasure. I am fighting for my freedom and for the freedom of my people, to free ourselves once and for all from Russian oppression.



For some reason in Georgia and in Ukraine people are allowed to free themselves from Russian oppression, and the whole world helps them in that, but for some reason for us it is forbidden. No-one helps us. But if you look from the point of view of international law we have more right according to international law to be independent from Russia than Georgia. Because Georgia once entered the Russian Empire voluntarily and in perpetuity. We never entered Russia, but always fought against the Russian Empire. We are now fighting, but are forbidden this right – we don’t have the right.



People misunderstand some things, for example by presenting us as separatists, that we want to separate from Russia. This is not true. We are not separatists, aggression has been committed against us according to international rights and law. Russia committed an act of aggression against us because we left the Soviet Union in autumn 1991, when the Russian Federation, Russia didn’t exist. We even passed a constitution of an independent, sovereign, democratic and state based on the rule of law on 12 March 1992, almost a month before the constitution of the Russian Federation. We have suffered aggression, but because Russia has a nuclear truncheon the whole world denies us the right to be free, the right given us by the Almighty Allah, the right given to us by God and they want to deprive us of it.



this is not a war between Muslims and Christians. Not between confessions but between faith and faithlessness. The majority of Russians are godless, and we are fighting with Satanism. Islam has retained its inner strength most, and has the power and ability to stand against world Satanism. Of Christianity and Judaism only the name has remained, and also practically from Islam. Today we’re fighting global Satanism that puts forward as its shield American imperialism and Russian chauvinism



Whether the Russians want it or not, we have won this war. We just have to put the stamp on it as they say. Time is on our side and is working for us. Our forces are with the grace of Allah in order, everyone knows what they’re doing, we don’t have chaos and disorganisation. We can fight for decades yet, but we want to stop this war because it is striking our own and other peaceful citizens, those that don’t take part in the war. Today in this war we have lost about 5000 Mujahideen, no more. In the two wars we have lost about 7000 Mujahideen. In the first war we lost 2800 and a few more Mujahideen, and there were about 200,000 civilians. That is why we are ready to stop the war, and as Maskhadov says to start negotiations without preconditions.



But there is one condition. That is the non-negotiable and full withdrawal of the occupying Russian troops from our territory. It is only possible in that case.



We welcome the initiative of the Soldiers’ Mothers, because in the end each person is obliged to be a person. Our prophet said if you see ill stop it with your hands, if you can’t stop it with your hands stop it with your tongue, if you cannot stop it with your tongue stop it with your heart. That is the smallest part of the iman.



We’re not romantics and not maniacs. We are fighting out of the necessity to defend our freedom and independence, to stop the undisguised genocide of the Chechen people, and today as I have said, there is a war between the descendents of monkeys – about whom your Darwin said – and the descendents of Adam, glory be to Allah. That is today’s war, between good and evil.


Paraphrase: This is the war of the descendants of Adam and Eve to put the animals in their place. I commit this to the great God and those who have taken the path to Jihad, the direct path to God. Allahu Akbar.

Channel 4 News
www.channel4.com

2005-02-04 13:12:03