September 30, 2011

Opinion: Turning to the Haqqanis, Pakistan has made its choice

The ISI’s ties to an insurgent network undermine any hope of real cooperation with the US


By Keith Yost


STAFF COLUMNIST


September 30, 2011

A pitfall of writing for this newspaper as frequently as I do is that sometimes a major event comes along and I find that I’ve already said most of what I wish to say. Such is the case with Admiral Michael G. Mullen’s recent admonishment of Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence for its ties to the Haqqani insurgent network.



It’s difficult for me to add more than what I’ve already written in “While Karachi Slowly Burns” (Sept. 10, 2010), or “Mission Accomplished” (May 6, 2011). Pakistan is a state with a major security problem — India — and two mutually-exclusive strategies to deal with that problem: a stable security partnership with the United States, or an increasing reliance on jihadi proxies. The former is a realistic path, as Pakistan and the United States have considerable mutual interests, while the latter is a monumental blunder, built on the quixotic notion that terrorists and guerrillas can somehow bleed India down to parity despite its seven to one advantage in men and materiel.



We have long hoped that Pakistan would choose America, not terrorists, as the guarantors of its security, but that hope has been in vain. Now, Admiral Mullen, Pakistan’s greatest remaining booster in the U.S. foreign policy establishment, has delivered what amounts to an ultimatum: either Pakistan severs its connection with the militant groups that are attacking NATO forces in Afghanistan, or America will sever its connection with Pakistan. The Pakistanis have refused to abandon the Haqqanis, and so the die is cast. The dissolution of the relationship between the United States and Pakistan is a fait accompli; it is inconceivable that the U.S. Congress will renew billions of dollars of aid for a country that is actively (and now publicly) engaged in the killing of U.S. troops.



The decision by the Obama administration to deliver the ultimatum to our nominal ally is not without its downsides. Our counter-terrorism efforts, as well as our war-fighting in Afghanistan, rely a great deal on Pakistan’s cooperation. However, in the long run, given Pakistan’s behavior, long-term U.S. interests in South and Central Asia are best served by a realignment toward India. The Obama administration deserves praise for its execution of this realignment. Years have been spent carefully setting the stage, giving the Pakistanis every opportunity to edge themselves back from their suicidal geopolitical strategy while simultaneously testing the waters of a U.S-India partnership. And the choice of timing is impeccable: U.S. forces in Afghanistan are higher than they have ever been before, giving the U.S. its maximal leverage against Pakistan, but the president’s political capital to remove those forces is also at its zenith, which undercuts Pakistan’s main source of leverage over the U.S. — namely, its supply routes to Afghanistan.



It is important that Obama (or the next president of the United States) appreciates the gravity and finality implicit in Pakistan’s rebuff of Mullen’s ultimatum. Already, some pundits are selling the cutesy notion of the U.S. being “frenemies” with Pakistan, as if international relations followed a script out of some Hollywood high school drama. But there is no intermediate status between friends and enemies to be found here — as the U.S. withdraws its support from Pakistan, Pakistan will compensate for this loss by relying even more strongly on militant groups like the Haqqanis to provide for its national security. The break-up, once initiated, can only accelerate.



In the long run, the U.S. playbook on Pakistan should grow to resemble that of India’s. The way to neuter an enemy is to carve them up into multiple states — such was Germany’s treatment by the allies after World War II, as well as the Soviet Union’s fate after its fall. India has already cut Pakistan in half, dividing it between modern Pakistan and Bangladesh. It seeks to do so again, exploiting the ethnic fault lines in Pakistani society to carve it up even further. With its parting shots in Afghanistan, the U.S. should use its military might to aid in this strategy.


In its least extreme form, this strategy might merely ensure that Baloch-dominated provinces within Afghanistan retain a high degree of autonomy from the Afghan federal government. In its most extreme form, the U.S. could funnel arms to Baloch nationalists in southern Pakistan or take direct action in support of a free Balochistan. Where the U.S. should fall on this spectrum of policy choices is open to debate — what must be avoided is the naive optimism that Pakistan will have a Damascene moment and suddenly become the ally that the U.S. requires. Now is the time to restructure Afghanistan in the way that makes Pakistan weakest, not to dither in a nonexistent middle ground.



History will look upon Pakistan’s embrace of jihadists as one of the greatest geopolitical missteps of the 21st century. To prevent itself from appearing with Pakistan in history’s list of blunderers, the U.S. must make its break with Pakistan a decisive one and resist the urge to force nuance into a situation that deserves none.



http://tech.mit.edu/V131/N41/pakistan.html

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear Sir,
Please change Paki flag in this article.. it showed Kashmir in Pak.
M'fucker Nehru's gift to Pak..

Thanks
Sandip Jadhav
USA

Anonymous said...

'Now is the time to restructure Afghanistan in the way that makes Pakistan weakest...' endorsed.

Anonymous said...

INDIA SHOULD TAKE PAKISTAN BACK, AS IT WAS ITS OWN PART AND TERITORY WHICH WAS SEPERATED BY BIRTISH AGENTS UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF MUSLIM SEPERATIST LEADER M.A JINNAH aka QADOO. TIME TO RE-TAKE AND MERGE FUKISTAN BACK WITH GREAT INDIA AND HANG ALL THOSE PAKI MILITARY AND ISI AGENTS WHO HAVE WAGED A WAR AGAINST INDIA ITS CITZENS AND AGAINST AFGHANISTAN AND NATO TROOPS.

ELIMINATE PAKISTAN--THIS IS THE UNFINISHED BUSINESS AND IT MUST BE DONE WITHOUT ANY DELAY. "NA RAHEY BAANS NA BAJAY BEHNSARY". TERRORISTS SHOULD NOT BE GIVEN ANY REFUGE OR CHANCE TO PLAY WITH PEOPLE'S LIVES AND TAKE THE REGION AND THE WORLD HOSTAGE. TIME FOR SOME BOLD ACTIONS.

Anonymous said...

Pakistan will die its own unnatural death within 5 years or so due to its inherent problems like failed and terrorist state factors coupled with nukes. No one needs to spend his time, money and energy for this. What you need to do is cut all your relations off with Pakistan and develop your capabilities to neutralize the fallouts of this death and to rebuild the debris as per your wish. Now wait and watch.