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Social Media is chit chat, it lives in the moment

Social Media is chit chat, it lives in the moment. Before Social Media, forums filled that role. Now all the chit chat is gone from forums, which means at least 90% of the audience is gone. In a decade ago you had in forums a lot of people visiting the site who didn't have interest in the niche of the forum at all. They were there for the chit chat, to waste time. This obviously brought life to forums even though probably 90% of the topics were outside of the niche. Nobody cared because activity is always a good thing, always, no exception.

Since SM now that activity is gone, and this hurt forums so much. Many are dead or can't get the huge numbers they once did. On top of that, as said above SM lives in the moment, the static approach of forums (you need to reload pages to get new content) wasn't beneficial either. Out of date technology. People wanted to connect faster and release their daily thoughts instantly. And SM provided that infrastructure aswell. So we lost the war against SM.

But SM killing our traffic was not as bad as the invention of smartphones. THAT was the killshot. Forums due to their nature (discussions) are not suited well for smartphones because of their small screens. That shift killed forums alone. Right now 99.99% of the users are just leechers. They take out their phones and let the content rain down on them. It is tiresome to create content on a phone, which is why everyone is just leeching and absorbing content. Think about why Twitter has a character limit. It would hurt their platform massively if they had no limit, if you would see wall of texts after wall of texts because smartphone users would get tired of seeing very long wall of texts all the time. So, keeping it to the minimum helps the leecher to lurk around as he can absorb content faster like this. Also he can create content more easily. Writing 2-3 lines on a smartphone is not a big deal. Imagine writing this post of myself on a phone...

Same thing is applied to Instagram. Just take a photo and upload it. Easy as that. So the current mainstream is a mirror of the device used, not other way around. A decade ago desktops were ahead of everything, and having a keyboard on hand resulted in long discussions which meant forums were ideal for that. Now anyone is on their smartphone and the limits of that device is the result why SM is so popular.

And of course we are behind current technologies (no standalone apps) so far, that it is not funny anymore. Imagine anything else having apps, and your site doesn't in 2020... You are basically irrelevant at this point as a forum and you will continue to serve only the powerusers of your niche, which will be a very low number.

I think at this point we should learn from reddit and see them as our rolemodels (as they are the biggest forum out there) + we should learn from Wikipedia.

Forums' biggest strength are to serve expertise to the users. As the chit chat is gone, the only thing working for us is the expertise we can distribute in our niche. And sadly forums are still the same bad information saver just like 20 years ago. 0 development in that regard. Good luck finding the valuable information in between millions of posts...

Extract from: https://www.theadminzone.com/members/sbjsbj.95688/

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