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COMMENT on World Sanskrit Book Fair by a visitor

 Young lads taking part in the World Sanskrit Book fair organised by Samskrita Bharati, a non-profit NGO, to mark its 30th anniversary at National College ground, Basavanagudi in Bangalore on January 7, 2011.

Young lads taking part in the World Sanskrit Book fair organised by Samskrita Bharati, a non-profit NGO, to mark its 30th anniversary at National College ground, Basavanagudi in Bangalore on January 7, 2011.

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Namaskaarams to all!

I visited the just concluded World Sanskrit Book Fair at Bangalore and went around the fair on all the four days. It was amazing to find that many samskrita enthusiasts, and especially, youngsters of all colours and bearings!

I experienced some problems which I am sure almost many would vouchsafe. Hopefully, the concerned authorities will look into it and try to minimize it if not wipe it altogether :

1. The area for the Book stalls was undoubtedly small considering the huge turn outs on all the four days. Perhaps the organizers wouldn't have expected such a large attendance.

2. The book stalls where the publishers had displayed their books were congested. A larger stall size will be an eye-catcher.

3. The passage area being narrow there was invariably push-arounds all the time. You could not see the books properly, let alone decide to buy them. There was literally shoulder-clash everywhere.

4. Even the people who bought the books, were seen just bundling their choice without bothering about their utility vis-a-vis their knowledge levels. You practically had no time to decide.

5. I thought the crowd may be less in the evening hours when there was manoranjan karyakrama. But alas, I had no luck that time also.

6. The only day I could somewhat freely move about was the last day. Bad luck here again! The stalls wore an empty look, most of the books having been sold out.

7. Some of the book sellers and publishers I talked to, especially, Sarawathy Mahal Library of Tanjore, and Parimal publications, had openly admitted that they did not anticipate such crowds and had brought only few samples of books.

8. The Exhibition was an eye opener for any proud Indian! How wide the eyes and mouth of the school children and college students opened, perhaps their hearts too, you should have been there to believe!

9. The rest room facilities, of course, could have been better. But given the temporary nature of arrangements, it was the best. The Green Buckets could have been more and maintenance still left much to be desired!

10. Finally, the Indian Motherhood was at its best! What I mean the food arrangements for the delegates and visitors, couldn't have been better! ( Do we not equate 'Anna Dhata' with the Motherhood?)

On the whole, we had a sense of seeing the Real Bharat!

Three cheers to Samskrita Bharati! You have won the hearts of one and all!

A Proud Indian

Comments

Hearing Aids said…
I really appreciate your post and you explain each and every point very well.Thanks for sharing this information.And I’ll love to read your next post too
Hearing Aids said…
I really appreciate your post and you explain each and every point very well.Thanks for sharing this information.And I’ll love to read your next post too
I recently came across your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don't know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.
I recently came across your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don't know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

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