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Showing posts from June 19, 2011

MEGATRENDS: DYNAMIC TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION AND THE GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY

New technologies and products will not catch on equally fast everywhere. We tell you which regions are receptive to innovations and what companies must do in order to develop future blockbusters. The sixth megatrend in the Roland Berger Trend Compendium analyzes the new challenges of the global knowledge society in 2030. What knowledge workers will companies need in the future and where will they find them? Who or what will drive innovation? The innovation potential of developed and developing countries differs significantly: developed countries have more financial and human resources. The United States is currently the leader in terms of innovation capacity, followed by Switzerland and Sweden. Germany ranks 9th out of 17 industrial states. Among developing countries, the upper-middle income countries achieve only 3.3% of the scientific innovation and invention rate of the high-income countries, and the lower-middle & low-income countries less than 0.6%. However, by 2030, some

Probability in Ancient India: a debate

An interesting debate is ongoing between Prof. C.K. Raju and Prof. Michael Witzel on the topic: Probability in Ancient India. This is at H-Net online (Humanities and Social Sciences – Discussion Networks). Here are the three messages of June 17, 18, 25, 2011 on a discussion log which may be of interest to researchers studying history of mathematics in ancient India and Greece. Here is the abstract from the draft referred to by Prof. Raju in his message of June 25, 2011: http://multiworldindia. org/wp-content/uploads/2010/ 05/ckr-Tehran-talk-on- academic-imperialism.pdf Ending Academic Imperialism: a Beginning Abstract: Academic imperialism begins with Western education, which has not been seriously challenged in hard sciences. Colonialism changed the system of education as a key means of containing revolt, and stabilising Western rule. The change was possible (e.g. by Macaulay in India) just because a large section of the colonised elite had already swallowed the racist beliefs