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Showing posts from August 21, 2011

Pakistan’s Bitter, Little-Known Ethnic Rebellion

August 23, 2011 By CARLOTTA GALL http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/24/world/asia/24baluch.html?_r=4&seid=auto&smid=tw-nytimes&pagewanted=print GENEVA — A slim figure in a dark suit, Brahumdagh Bugti, 30, could pass for a banker in the streets of this sedate Swiss city. But in truth he is a resistance leader in exile, a player in an increasingly ugly independence war within Pakistan . He has been on the run since 2006, when he narrowly escaped a Pakistani Army operation that killed his grandfather and dozens of his tribesmen in the southwestern province of Baluchistan. And since then, the government’s attempt to stamp out an uprising by the Baluch ethnic minority has only intensified, according to human rights organizations and Pakistani politicians. The Baluch insurgency, which has gone on intermittently for decades, is often called Pakistan’s Dirty War, because of the rising numbers of people who have disappeared or have been killed on both sides. But it has received lit

Libya After Gadhafi: Transitioning from Rebellion to Rule Read more: Libya After Gadhafi: Transitioning from Rebellion to Rule

By Scott Stewart August 24, 2011 | 1908 GMT v " Libya After Gadhafi: Transitioning from Rebellion to Rule is republished with permission of STRATFOR. With the end of the Gadhafi regime seemingly in sight, it is an opportune time to step back and revisit one of the themes we discussed at the beginning of the crisis: What comes after the Gadhafi regime? As the experiences of recent years in Iraq and Afghanistan have vividly illustrated, it is far easier to depose a regime than it is to govern a country. It has also proved to be very difficult to build a stable government from the remnants of a long-established dictatorial regime. History is replete with examples of coalition fronts that united to overthrow an oppressive regime but then splintered and fell into internal fighting once the regime they fought against was toppled. In some cases, the power struggle resulted in a civil war more brutal than the one that brought down the regime. In other cases, this factional strife r

Libya After Gadhafi: Transitioning from Rebellion to Rule Read more: Libya After Gadhafi: Transitioning from Rebellion to Rule | STRATFOR

By Scott Stewart August 24, 2011 | 1908 GMT v " Libya After Gadhafi: Transitioning from Rebellion to Rule is republished with permission of STRATFOR. With the end of the Gadhafi regime seemingly in sight, it is an opportune time to step back and revisit one of the themes we discussed at the beginning of the crisis: What comes after the Gadhafi regime? As the experiences of recent years in Iraq and Afghanistan have vividly illustrated, it is far easier to depose a regime than it is to govern a country. It has also proved to be very difficult to build a stable government from the remnants of a long-established dictatorial regime. History is replete with examples of coalition fronts that united to overthrow an oppressive regime but then splintered and fell into internal fighting once the regime they fought against was toppled. In some cases, the power struggle resulted in a civil war more brutal than the one that brought down the regime. In other cases, this factional strife r

The Current State of Leadership – Research Findings

http://www.thepracticeofleadership.net/the-current-state-of-leadership-research-findings Development Dimensions International (DDI) a respected, global talent management company recently published their Global Leadership Forecast 2011 . This report is one of the largest leadership studies of it’s kind, with more than 2,600 participating organizations. The research provides some interesting perspectives on the current state of leadership and future leadership needs. Specifically, the report looked to uncover the answers to the following questions: What is the overall quality of leadership in organizations today? How does it compare to previous years? Do organizations have a sufficient supply of capable leaders to meet tomorrow’s business challenges? What can HR professionals do to revolutionize the development of their leaders? Is it time to radically innovate not only products and business models, but also the very way we manage? What impact can we have by moving the needle on leade

NEHRU-GANDHI FAMILY: A CRIME OF HISTORICAL PROPORTIONS.

The following are some of the Government Schemes and Projects that have been named after the Nehru-Gandhi family. Central Government Schemes : 1. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana, Ministry of Power – A scheme “Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana” for Rural Electricity Infrastructure and Household Electrification was ...launched for the attainment of the National Common Minimum Programme of providing access to electricity to all Rural Household by 2009. Rural Electrification Corporation (REC) is the nodal agency for the scheme. Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana to be continued during the Eleventh Plan period with a capital subsidy of Rs. 28000 Crore; allocation of Rs 5500 crore for FY09. 2. Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (RGNDWM), Ministry of Rural Development, Annual allocation plan 2007-08 was Rs.6,400 crore and Annual allocation plan 2008-09 is Rs.7,300 crore. 3. Rajiv Gandhi National Crèche Scheme for the Chi