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Showing posts from November 4, 2012

No takers for Karnatak University Dharwad Sanskrit course

  http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hubli/No-takers-for-Karnatak-University-Dharwad-Sanskrit-course/articleshow/17136852.cms Srinivas Reddy, TNN | Nov 8, 2012 HUBLI: Sanskrit is considered the mother of all languages in India, but unfortunately it is being meted step-motherly treatment. The PG course on Sanskrit in Karnatak University, Dharwad (KUD), has had almost no takers this year. Worse, Sanskrit faculty in the department have been shifted to administration and sportsdepartment in the university.  Against an intake of 10 students, this year only three students enrolled for the course. Earlier the Sanskrit department used to get around 9-10 students every year, but the number was steadily declining and it dropped to its worst count of three this academic year. B L Naduni, chairman, department of Sanskrit, KUD, said: "We enrolled five students last year while only three students have come this year in Sanskrit department."  One of the main reasons why students

Pakistan's minority Hindus feel under attack

By REBECCA SANTANA, Associated Press – 1 day ago   KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) — They came after dusk and chanted into the night sky "Kill the Hindus, kill the children of the Hindus," as they smashed religious icons, ripped golden bangles off women's arms and flashed pistols. It wasn't the first time that the Hindu temple on the outskirts of Pakistan's largest city was attacked, and residents here fear it will not be the last. "People don't consider us as equal citizens. They beat us whenever they want," said Mol Chand, one of the teenage boys gathered at the temple. "We have no place to worship now." It was the second time the Sri Krishna Ram temple has been attacked, and this time the mob didn't even bother to disguise their faces. The small temple, surrounded by a stone wall, is a tiny religious outpost in a dusty, hardscrabble neighborhood so far on the outskirts of the city that a sign on the main road wishes people leaving Karachi

Pakistan tells Bangladesh to ‘bury the past’

  By: Agencies | November 10, 2012 AMMAN JI MAAF KARO. AAYENDA AYSEE GHALATEE NAHEEN HOGEE. Hina Khar DHAKA  – Pakistan told Bangladesh to carry forward bilateral ties by 'burying the past' when former East Pakistan demanded a formal apology from Islamabad for the alleged excesses committed by its troops during the 1971 war.Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, who was on 6-hour tour to Dhaka, also invited Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina to attend 8th D-8 Summit to be held in Islamabad on November 22. The apology issue came up in a meeting of the foreign ministers of the two Muslim South Asian states, which had began their journey of freedom together in 1947 as a single state but were separated in 1971 as a result of Pakistan-India war, preceded by New Delhi-stoked insurgency in the Eastern wing of the united Pakistan. Foreign Secretary Mijarul Quayes quoted Foreign Minister Dipu Moni as telling her Pakistani counterpart Hina Rabbani Khar that Bangladesh expects an ap

‘The Baloch Woman’

The single most visibly distinguishing factor which identifies the Baloch nation is the Balochi Gud or female attire. At its best, it is a work of sheer wonderment to behold, unique in the world in its design. The Baloch woman will gather several rolls of coloured thread and a base pattern in her mind's eye and then does she begin to weave with meticulous care the Balochi dress. She does so piece by piece, every segment, be it the 'asting' or 'guamtam' requiring a slight alteration in technique to adjust for its place on the dress albeit with the same coloured threads for that specific 'gud'. Attention to detail which can cause severe straining of the eyes over a prolonged period of time eventually gives rise to what are often simply described as masterpieces of artwork. It is the trade in the Balochi dress that has kept afloat many a Baloch family through difficult financial times and made the Baloch woman the backbone of the economi

MAO’S THOUGHTS HAUNT CPC CONGRESS

B.RAMAN The 18 th Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) began at Beijing on November 8,2012, with the traditional inaugural statement by the  outgoing Party General Secretary, Mr.Hu Jintao. 2. After the inaugural statement, delegates from different provinces and regions take it up for detailed discussion before approving it. These detailed panel discussions are more important than the statement by the outgoing General Secretary because often the new party leaders who will be in office for the next 10 years initiate these panel discussions in important panels and draw attention to the important themes of the inaugural statement. 3.On November 8,2012, after Mr.Hu had read out his statement,Mr.XiJinping, who is tipped to take over from Mr.Hu as the next General Secretary before the Congress concludes, initiated the panel discussion before the delegates from Shanghai, who play a prominent and powerful role in the party affairs. 4. The details of h

Gandhi Statue Unveiled in Davie, Florida by Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam

Gandhi Statue Unveiled in  Davie ,  Florida Former President of  India , Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam and Davie Mayor Judy Paul unveiled a seven feet tall bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi on October 02, 2012 in the Town of Davie, Florida Thousands of residents from the area including Indian American families joined the festivities despite the heavy rains. It was quite a miracle that the rain stopped for enough time to allow the Unveiling Ceremonies to complete and started raining again when His Excellency Abdul Kalam commented “what an auspicious occasion!” President Abdul Kalam was received at the Airport by the Board of Trustees of the Mahatma Gandhi Square Florida – a Corporation organized for the purpose.  Among them were Dr. Piyush C. Agrawal, Mr. Joy Kuttiyani, Mr. Babu Varghese, Mr. Shekar Redddy, Mr. Chacko Philip, Mr. Hemant Patel, Vivek Swaroop, and Dr, Sajan Kurian. Welcoming the President, Mayor Judy Paul enumerated many of the accomplishments of her guest.  She pa

The Expensive, Diminishing Threat of Somali Piracy

November 8, 2012 | 1000 GMT   Stratfor By Ben West Piracy off the coast of Somalia has dropped off dramatically in 2012. Successful ship hijackings have decreased from 31 in 2011 (and 49 in 2010) to only four so far in 2012. Attacks against ships have also decreased, falling from 199 reported attacks in the first nine months of 2011 to 70 attacks over the same span in 2012 -- a 65 percent drop. However, diminished activity does not necessarily mean a decrease in the cost of sailing around the Horn of Africa. Somali pirates occupy a unique position, which is right along highly strategic global shipping lanes yet outside the reach of any national power. For international actors, it is politically and militarily easier to try to contain the Somali piracy threat than to eliminate it. But containment comes at a high cost. Controlling Territory Many factors have contributed to the decrease in pirate hijackings in 2012. One factor is that shipping companies have begun equipping their ships

MY TAKE ON OBAMA’S VICTORY

B.RAMAN To be fair to President Barack Obama, one cannot deny that he inherited a bad economy from his predecessor Mr.George Bush. It became worse partly  due to lack of energetic handling by his economic team  and partly due to the global economic melt-down during his first term. 2. The cumulative effect was a seemingly bad economic record which was sought to be exploited skilfully by his challenger Mr.Mitt Romney. During the first Presidential debate, Mr.Romney managed to keep the spotlight  focussed on Mr.Obama for the declining state of the economy. 3. After the first debate, the economy started showing glacial signs of improvement. The unemployment rate stopped increasing. More jobs were being created. More people started getting jobs. The deficit position remained as bad as ever, but the job market was not as gloomy as it was before the first Presidential debate. 4. Not many analysts noticed these glacial changes for the better in the job market.

Unable to copy it, China tries building own jet engine

  HONG KONG | Mon Oct 29, 2012 5:04pm EDT (Reuters) - China has designed nuclear missiles and blasted astronauts into space, but one vital technology remains out of reach. Despite decades of research and development, China has so far failed to build a reliable, high performance jet engine. This may be about to change. China's aviation sector is striving for a breakthrough that would end its dependence on Russian and Western power plants for military and commercial aircraft. Beijing is evaluating a 100 billion yuan ($16 billion) plan to galvanize a disjointed and under-funded engine research effort, aviation industry officials say. The giant, state-owned Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC), China's dominant military and commercial aviation contractor, has been lobbying hard for the extra money, officials familiar with the details say. AVIC, with more than 400,000 employees and 200 subsidiaries including 20 listed companies, has already set aside about 10 billion

Elections of Destiny: Reagan in 1980 and Gladstone in 1880

By Martin Sieff Elections matter, but some matter more than others. In 1880, the triumph of William Gladstone's Liberals over Benjamin Disraeli's Tories set in motion the long, slow decline of British industry, which left the country dangerously vulnerable. Remarkably, writes Martin Sieff, a century later the election of Ronald Reagan in the United States set in motion a similar decline. "It's morning again in America," began the famous television ad for President Ronald Reagan's successful re-election campaign in 1984. Yet while Reagan's approach to governing has lost none of its appeal to today's Republicans, it is clear that, three decades after decisively winning his first term in 1980, Reagan launched the United States on a long period of industrial decline and growing indebtedness to the rest of the world. It was also no coincidence that during those same three decades, America's annual trade deficit grew to become the biggest of any nati

China in transition sees Obama re-election as a chance to rebuild ties

  http://www.telegraphindia.com/archives/archive.html BEIJING, Nov 7 (Reuters): China's official media said on Thursday that ties with the United States were uneven in President Barack Obama's first term and mutual trust was "whittled down", but his re-election offered an opportunity to put the relationship back on track. A commentary issued by state-run Xinhua news agency shortly after Obama's election win seemed to indicate a sense of relief that continuity will be assured as Chinese leaders embark on their own transition of power. But it acknowledged that sore issues remained between the world's largest and second-largest economies. "As the two countries have been ever more economically interwoven, a new US government perhaps should start to learn how to build a more rational and constructive relationship with China," Xinhua said. "The new Obama administration perhaps should bear in mind that a stronger and more dynamic China-US relatio

Survival is an uphill task for this Sanskrit paper

This is their website: http://sudharma.epapertoday.com/ If you wish to help, you can donate here http://sudharma.epapertoday.com/donate/   http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-10-09/mysore/34342409_1_sanskrit-scholar-ancient-language-sound-language Kevin Mendonsa, TNN Oct 9, 2012 MYSORE: Sudharma, the world's only Sanskrit daily celebrated its 43rd anniversary on Sunday. The single sheet daily which has a circulation of 4,000 and covers news, politics, yoga, vedas and culture. The long journey hasn't been a bed of roses. Kalale Nadadur Varadaraja Iyengar, a Sanskrit scholar, started the paper on July 15, 1970, to spread the language of the gods. K V Sampath Kumar, its editor and son of Varadaraja Iyengar, says that it has been a struggle to keep the newspaper going. "The circulation is shrinking day by day as there is no support or encouragement from the government. It's a pity that the powers-that-be do not realize the historic role of Sanskrit, wh

Obama: New twist to the ‘melting pot’

http://www.vijayvaani.com/FrmPublicDisplayArticle.aspx?id=2535 Sandhya Jain 8 November 2012   At the end of America's costliest and nastiest electoral battles, widely predicted by analysts to be 'hung' like the George Bush – Al Gore encounter in 2000, President Barack Obama made history as the second Democrat president to win a second term in office since the Second World War. By the time his Republican rival Mitt Romney conceded defeat, Barack Obama had beaten a vicious negative campaign funded by the super rich One Percent, who possibly turned the tide in his favour with their corrosive racism.   The huge presence of coloured and mixed races in the electorate gave an unexpected twist to America's proud self-definition as a 'melting pot' of different nationalities, races, and religions, because hitherto it has been a White-dominated and defined 'melting pot'. Now, with non-Whites making their aspirations and their voices count in the domestic arena,