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Showing posts from April 28, 2013

No First Use Nuclear Doctrine with “Chinese Characteristics”

  Dr. Adityanjee http://www.vifindia.org/article/2013/may/02/no-first-use-nuclear-doctrine-with-chinese-characteristics Introduction Like a chameleon, the dragon, very predictably is changing its colors with regards to its often stated nuclear doctrine of "no first use" (NFU). Since 1964 when China conducted its first nuclear weapon test, China has repeatedly and vociferously insisted that it would not be the first nuclear power to use a tactical or strategic nuclear weapon in pursuit of its strategic objectives. This NFU pledge was explicitly and unconditionally included in each of China's defense white papers from the first in 1998 through the seventh one in 2011. Recently, there is some international debate about possible changes in China's NFU doctrine following publication of China's biannual 2013 Defense White Paper. However, it appears that China may have moved beyond its so-called NFU doctrine and its duplicitous pledges do not hold any sincere meaning.

Has status quo been altered by the Chinese side?

T C  http://www.deccanherald.com/content/330325/has-status-quo-been-altered.html A Rangachari, May 5, 2013, DHNS: India-China relations Are we heading back to a round of 'forward' policy on the India-China border? Is the Depsang incursion an attempt by China to create new ground realities by matching ground positions with its map positions?   That the India-China border is unresolved is known well enough. That in itself is unlikely to be the cause for the Chinese incursion - and potential settlement - in the Depsang area of the Western Sector in Ladakh since April 15. It is the differing claim lines of the two sides and the lack of clarity regarding the Line of Actual Control (LAC) that leaves open the possibility of either side altering the status quo by establishing a ground presence which accords with its own claim. The other side is then left with the option of accepting the new ground reality or taking steps to challenge it, if necessary by military means. Hitherto, in

India-China Relations and the Changing Nature of War

May 3, 2013 by Team SAISA    http://southasianidea.com/analysis/india-china-relations-and-the-changing-nature-of-war/ Mohan Guruswamy The nature of war is directly related to the technology of the times and the resources available. But how we can fight and how long we might fight increasingly depends on the willingness of the world as a whole to allow it. War between countries and particularly war between major powers will not be without consequences to the ever increasingly inter-dependent world and hence international pressure to terminate conflicts before they expand and/or spiral out of control is only to be expected, especially when the nations in conflict are armed with nuclear weapons. How many nuclear weapons a country has does not matter, as for the world outside even the use of one will not be without huge collateral consequences? Considering this, this may be a good time and place to ponder over the future nature of war and how this would impact India. The end of the Col

No First Use Nuclear Doctrine with “Chinese Characteristics”

  Dr. Adityanjee http://www.vifindia.org/article/2013/may/02/no-first-use-nuclear-doctrine-with-chinese-characteristics Introduction Like a chameleon, the dragon, very predictably is changing its colors with regards to its often stated nuclear doctrine of "no first use" (NFU). Since 1964 when China conducted its first nuclear weapon test, China has repeatedly and vociferously insisted that it would not be the first nuclear power to use a tactical or strategic nuclear weapon in pursuit of its strategic objectives. This NFU pledge was explicitly and unconditionally included in each of China's defense white papers from the first in 1998 through the seventh one in 2011. Recently, there is some international debate about possible changes in China's NFU doctrine following publication of China's biannual 2013 Defense White Paper. However, it appears that China may have moved beyond its so-called NFU doctrine and its duplicitous pledges do not hold any sincere meaning.

Is India’s Nuclear Deterrent Credible?

By  Shyam Saran   I wish to share with you my thoughts on certain issues of contemporary relevance to India's national security.  While I have been introduced as the Chairman of India's National Security Advisory Board I must hasten to add that the views  I shall be sharing with you today are entirely my own and do not in any way reflect those of the Board or of the government. These are views that have evolved over a fairly long period of time drawing upon my earlier experience dealing with disarmament and international security issues at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, the two year stint I had at the Prime Minister's Office in 1991-92, handling issues relating to External Affairs, Defence and Atomic Energy and more recently my involvement in the Indo-US  negotiations on a Civil Nuclear Cooperation agreement, both as Foreign Secretary and later as Prime Minister's Special Envoy. I believe I have a fair sense of how our security perceptions have evolved over