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Showing posts from April 8, 2018

Nepalese PM K.P. Oli visits India as Both Countries Hope to Turn the Page in Relations

Nepalese PM K.P. Oli visits India as Both Countries Hope to Turn the Page in Relations Nepal’s Prime Minister, Khadga Prasad Sharma Oli,  arrived  in India Friday for a three-day visit. The visit comes after a major downturn in India-Nepal ties. Background:  In 2015, Nepal began drafting  a new Constitution. Oli, the Prime Minister then as well, was the primary architect of this Constitution and publicly rallied for it to be adopted, but India took an opposing point of view, arguing that the document did not address the concerns of certain communities. The episode  culminated with India supporting a blockade by a group called the Madhesis in an attempt to generate pressure on Oli’s government by blocking supplies. However, Oli used India’s actions to push forth an ultra-nationalist, and even anti-India narrative, as well as call for closer ties with China. The episode ended with Oli and his coalition decisively  beating  a coalition backed by India in the general elections this year.

The Ambivalence of Syria’s Child Reporters

Muftah.org The Ambivalence of Syria’s Child Reporters Mariam Sleiman April 9th, 2018 Often referred to as the most documented war of the 21st century — if not ever — the Syrian war and the trove of reporting, images and videos around it, have introduced a new dynamic into the modern mediation of war. The removal of major media empires from the day to day of war reporting and the involvement, instead, of Syrian citizen journalists has seemingly righted a wrong intrinsic to journalism, namely that the role of the discipline is to give voice to the voiceless — in this case, by allowing the voiceless to speak and broadcast for themselves. The rise of Syrian citizen journalists and their filling of a major gap in news reporting has engendered an entirely new way of communicating the daily terrors of war, one that does not shy away from the activism inherent to journalism, and has created an ecosystem that privileges truth over the valorized objectivity and distance of traditional media

Has China’s massive navy parade soothed a century of wounded national pride?

http://m.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2141740/chinas-massive-navy-parade-soothes-century-wounded-national-pride Has China’s massive navy parade soothed a century of wounded national pride? Show of maritime power comes more than 120 years after a catastrophic military loss Zhuang Pinghui UPDATED : Saturday, 14 Apr 2018, 10:01PM  9 The staging of China’s biggest display of naval power this week prompted comparisons with a catastrophic military defeat at the hands of Japan more than a century ago. China’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, was the centrepiece of a massive parade off the waters of Sanya in the South China Sea on Thursday. The display, watched by Chinese President Xi Jinping, involved about 50 warships and nearly 80 aircraft, including jets, bombers and early-warning planes. The parade came 124 years after the navy’s collapse in the first Sino-Japanese war, known in China as the Jiawu war, despite efforts to modernise the fleet and the deployment of two Ge

The United Nations of China: A vision of the world order

http://www.ecfr.eu/publications/summary/the_united_nations_of_china_a_vision_of_the_world_order The United Nations of China: A vision of the world order China Analysis François Godement, Moritz Rudolf, Marc Julienne,  Marie-Hélène Schwoob & Kata Isenring-Szabó 12th April, 2018 UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré  - © SUMMARY Articles in this edition of China Analysis include: François Godement: IntroductionMoritz Rudolf: Chinese scholars’ increasing outspokenness on UN reformMarc Julienne: China’s evolving role in peacekeeping operationsMarie-Hélène Schwoob: Chinese views on the global agenda for developmentKata Isenring-Szabó: China’s views on the Human Rights Council (UNHRC) INTRODUCTION François Godement China’s participation in the United Nations system is often viewed through a succession of single lenses: its use of the veto over the last few years (less often than Russia, but more than Western permanent members of the UN Security Council); its financial contribution (now t

Alone in the desert? How France can lead Europe in the Middle East

http://www.ecfr.eu/publications/summary/alone_in_the_desert_how_france_can_lead_europe_in_the_middle_east Alone in the desert? How France can lead Europe in the Middle East Policy Brief Manuel Lafont Rapnouil  @mlafontrapnouil 10th April, 2018 John Spooner via Flickr  (cropped) -  CC by NC 2.0 SUMMARY The Middle East is a key stage for France’s foreign policy, one where it bids to prove its credentials as an international power, punching above its weight and demonstrating the independence that is so important to the French sense of place in the world.In this context, the Arab uprisings and their subsequent upheavals have been a particular challenge, to such an extent that France attempted to recalibrate its strategy. Despite this, France soon settled back into its traditional realism by adopting an approach based on “reassurance”.Under this approach, France sought to foster stability by reassuring its partners against their perceived anxiety in the face of domestic instability