Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from April 7, 2019

Election 2019: Representation Gap, Trend to track

https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/the-representation-gap-2/ Written by  Christophe Jaffrelot ,  Gilles Verniers  |Updated: July 24, 2015 12:00:12 am Since the late 1980s, one of the most significant trends in Indian politics has been the gradual decline of upper-caste representation in the Lok Sabha, and the concomitant rise of OBCs. This phenomenon was essentially due to the decline of the Congress — a party dominated by upper castes — and to the rise of regional parties, primarily supported by large, dominant OBC groups. In 1989, the proportion of OBCs in the Lok Sabha had jumped from 11 per cent to 21 per cent, and continued to grow in the post-Mandal phase until 2004, when it peaked at 26 per cent. In parallel, the representation of upper castes persistently fell, from 49 per cent in 1984 to 37 per cent in 1989 and 34 per cent in 2004. The gap between OBCs and upper caste MPs returned from the Hindi-speaking belt had never been so small. The 2009 general elections

The Future Of The Fight To Preserve Uyghur Culture

The Future Of The Fight To Preserve Uyghur Culture As the Chinese government crushes Uyghur culture in Xinjiang, Uyghurs abroad are making new efforts to preserve their traditions — but will they succeed? Some scholars say a revival is possible. KELLY NG APRIL 8, 2019 0 Top photo: A village meshrep, or Uyghur community gathering incorporating music, dance, and other arts in 2009 featuring female singer  Sanubar Tursun . Credit: Aziz Isa Elkun.   “Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes,” sang the kids gathered at an education center in Virginia, to the tune of the classic children’s song — except they were not doing so in English, but in Uyghur language. These are among the 60 Uyghur students — ages ranging from two to early 30s — who come to Ana Care & Education on Sundays to learn their mother tongue. Marketing manager Irade Kashgary started the school in Fairfax, Virginia, with her mother, Sureyya, in February 2017. It is one of many projects by the Uyghur diaspo

There's still no American solution for 5G

AXIOS CHINA Bill Bishop Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios   Axios reported this morning on the Trump administration's plans to unveil a big  5G push : Details:  At a White House event today, [President] Trump and FCC Chairman Ajit Pai plan to make two announcements. 1. Airwaves:  The FCC will auction off three big slices of millimeter-wave airwaves that are crucial to connecting new devices at high speeds... 2. Funding:  The agency will announce a "Rural Digital Opportunity Fund" to spend $20.4 billion over 10 years in rural broadband. Between the lines:  This plan does not look it will do anything to address the fact that there are really only four hardware firms that can built a 5G network: Sweden’s Ericsson, Finland’s Nokia and China’s Huawei and ZTE. As Brian Fung explains in the  Washington Post : “There is no U.S.-based wireless access equipment provider today that builds those solutions,” said Sandra Rivera, a senior vice president at Intel who helps gui

GCSC Cyberstability Update,12 April 2019

GCSC Cyberstability Update,12 April  2019 Your weekly news updates on the GCSC, its members, and relevant developments in the field of international cyber affairs. For more information about the GCSC, please visit  www.cyberstability.org . European Union Embeds Protection of the Public Core of the Internet in New EU Cybersecurity Act This article was published on the  GCSC website , 11 April 2019   The Council of the European Union  adopted the EU Cybersecurity Act , including a clear commitment to protect the Public Core of the open Internet.  The protection of the public core of the Internet is a principal norm  developed by the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace (GCSC).   Read More INTERNATIONAL CYBER AFFAIRS: G7 Dinard Declaration on the Cyber Norm Initiative   This declaration by the G7 Foreign Ministers was published in  France Diplomatie , 6 April 2019   The G7 Foreign Ministers met in Dinard and Saint Malo on 5 and 6 April 2019. One of the outcomes

There's still no American solution for 5G

AXIOS CHINA Bill Bishop Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios   Axios reported this morning on the Trump administration's plans to unveil a big  5G push : Details:  At a White House event today, [President] Trump and FCC Chairman Ajit Pai plan to make two announcements. 1. Airwaves:  The FCC will auction off three big slices of millimeter-wave airwaves that are crucial to connecting new devices at high speeds... 2. Funding:  The agency will announce a "Rural Digital Opportunity Fund" to spend $20.4 billion over 10 years in rural broadband. Between the lines:  This plan does not look it will do anything to address the fact that there are really only four hardware firms that can built a 5G network: Sweden’s Ericsson, Finland’s Nokia and China’s Huawei and ZTE. As Brian Fung explains in the  Washington Post : “There is no U.S.-based wireless access equipment provider today that builds those solutions,” said Sandra Rivera, a senior vice president at Intel who helps gui

Why NOTA may be an emerging trend in the Lok Sabha elections

Economic Times, India View: Why NOTA may be an emerging trend in the Lok Sabha elections NOTA constituted 1.1 % of the total votes polled in the 2014 Lok Sabha elections, despite overwhelming mandate given to the Modi’s BJP. By ET CONTRIBUTORS | Apr 11, 2019, 11.57 AM IST By Prasad Nallapati Many of my acquaintances that I spoke to recently have shown a general apathy toward the general elections currently underway in the country and expressed their intention to vote for  NOTA , a provision on the ballot paper to vote for “None Of The Above”. The mood is not just an expression of displeasure against the candidates in the fray but a general anguish over the way the political parties are conducting themselves. ADVERTISEMENT Although they do not form a big enough sample to draw broader conclusions, there is visible anger and disillusionment with the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) among the electorate. This is further accentuated by the fact that they do not see any worthwhile

Indian Elections 2019: Five Things You Should Know

India’s general election kicks off on 11 April, and with more than 900 million eligible voters, 1 million polling stations and seven phases spread across five weeks, it will be the world’s largest exercise in democracy. Dr Gareth Price explains five things you should know about what to expect. Chatham House Apr 8 The Indian Parliament building stands in the background behind a statue of Mahatma Gandhi. Photo: Getty Images. Why are these elections important? The Indian elections are important on two levels. First, the Indian elections are the biggest democratic event in history. This year, around 900 million Indians will be eligible to vote and around two-thirds of them are likely to do so. Second, these elections are of particular importance because they are likely to determine the type of country India will be over the next decade or two. The opposition parties argue that they celebrate India’s diversity — of religions, languages and ethnicities. The ruling Bharatiya Janata P

GLOBAL TRENDS TO 2030 – CHALLENGES AND CHOICES FOR EUROPE

The next decade will be defining for the future of Europe and Europe's role in the world. Seismic global power shifts; pressure on liberal democracies; challenges to global governance; the transformation of economic models and the very fabric of societies; new uses and misuses of technology; contrasting demographic patterns; and humanity's growing ecological footprint - the world is well on its way towards a new geopolitical, geo-economic and geotechnological order. What role will Europe play in this fast-changing world?     Against this backdrop, the ESPAS Global Trends to 2030: Challenges and Choices for Europe Report is a contribution to support policy- and decision-makers as they navigate the world into 2030. Download Report

Afghanistan’s Rivers Could Be India’s Next Weapon Against Pakistan

Defencenews.in Wednesday, November 14, 2018 By: Foreign Policy  Most of Afghanistan is currently experiencing a 60 percent drop in the rain and snowfall needed for food production. The rapid expansion of Kabul’s population, extreme drought conditions across the country, and the specter of climate change have exacerbated the need for new water infrastructure. But building it is politically complicated; the Afghanistan-Pakistan border region is defined by its complex maze of transboundary rivers and there is no legal framework in place to avoid major conflict between the nations. It’s no surprise, then, that in the Chahar Asiab district of Kabul, on a tributary of the Kabul River, the Maidan, work is scheduled to begin soon on the Shahtoot Dam. The dam will hold 146 million cubic meters of potable water for 2 million Kabul residents and irrigate 4,000 hectares of land. It will also provide drinking water for a new city on the outskirts of Kabul called Deh Sabz. Afghanistan is finall

MEET THE AUTHOR: NICHOLAS J. CULL

USCpublicdiplomacy.org Apr 9, 2019 CPD Faculty Fellow  Nicholas J. Cull  is Professor and Director of the Master of Public Diplomacy program at USC and a prolific historian in the field of public diplomacy. His latest book,  Public Diplomacy: Foundations for Global Engagement in the Digital Age , is out this spring. We sat down with Cull to ask him about this latest contribution to the field. As technologies continue to forge ahead at breakneck speeds, how should today’s public diplomats integrate foundational lessons from history? It is clear to me that while technologies change, human beings are basically as they were in the age of the Ancient Greek sages. I was thrilled to find that the thinker Bias of Priene from 500 BCE hit many of my core points. He is mentioned much more than Mark Zuckerberg in my text! My objective was to provide the core tools for understanding the practice of public diplomacy—how it differs from propaganda; the role of listening, advocacy, culture, excha

Why China won’t call JeM terrorists?

Why has China consistently refused to categorize Kashmiri militant  Masood Azhar and his group, Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM), as terrorists?  Writing in Foreign Policy , Yelena Biberman and Jared Schwartz offer a plausible theory: China and Pakistan are facing a delicate balancing act. They both want to push the Taliban to engage with Kabul. But  the Taliban, which have extensive ties to groups such as JeM, can generate instability in the region  through operations similar to the February 14 attack in response to pressure. China and Pakistan, in order to protect the  China Pakistan Economic Corridor  (CPEC), must simultaneously remain on the militant groups’ good side and cajole the Taliban. The potential costs of failure, such as regional chaos and lost investment, are high. But the potential benefits of success — snatching Afghanistan from India while building a massive economic corridor with security benefits likely to follow — are highly alluring. Another blow against freedom of a

EVENT: Foundation for Advancing Cultural Ties

Washington D.C. Schedule: Guest Speaker: François Gautier On The Need To Rewrite Indian History. Organization: FACT, USA - Foundation for Advancing Cultural Ties. * Durga Hindu Temple,* Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM Date: Sunday, April 14 2019. Location: Durga Hindu Temple, 8400 Durga Place, Fairfax Station, VA 22039 Home: http://durgatemple.org/ To RSVP : https://factdc.eventbrite.com FB Invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/400483594075462 * India International School.* Time : 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM * Date : Sunday, April 14* * India International School & Cultural Center* 4433 Unit R, Brookfield Corporate Drive, Chantilly, Virginia 20151 +1 703-817-9733 admin@indiaschool.org Welcome to take volunteer . To Join FACT US Whatsapp Group https://chat.whatsapp.com/BvTAcENfqZNKvJ14RVl2j0 About : Francois Gautier, a French author & journalist, covering India & South Asia for the last 35 years. In decades of reporting he noticed most western correspondents were proje

China's Digital Raise: Challenges for Europe

China's efforts at home and abroad to become a global leader in digital technologies is a challenge for Europe. The ambitions of telecommunications giant Huawei to participate in building European 5G networks are just one example of many, say MERICS researchers  Kristin Shi-Kupfer and  Mareike Ohlberg , authors of a new MERICS study, "China's digital rise. Challenges for Europe.” Click here to download  this MERICS Paper on China as PDF  or read the Executive Summary below. Executive Summary China is making headway in achieving global leadership in 5G, AI and quantum computing and in other digital and disruptive technologiesThe Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is pursuing a comprehensive digital strategy encompassing the search for new economic growth drivers, cyber governance and global power projectionSelected leading Chinese ICT companies are co-shaping the global digital architectureWith its proactive approach to standardization, China sets operational rules for forei