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Showing posts from April 14, 2019

INDIA'S SOFT POWER

Apr 16, 2019   In December 2018, CPD served as primary academic partner for India's first major  Conference on Soft Power , hosted by the India Foundation in New Delhi. The three-day conference hosted speakers from industries essential to Indian culture nationally and abroad. They discussed how India can capitalize on its unique customs and cultural hallmarks to create a strong national brand to shape the country's future on the world stage. Some of the most powerful Indian cultural assets are textiles, dance and of course, yoga. CPD Graduate Student Journalism Fellow  Austin Maddox  sat down with three Indian thought-leaders in these fields about India's national brand and how the country can achieve its soft power goals. Art, Craft and Design Textile craftsmanship is one of the oldest Indian traditions that conveys “cultural motifs and patterns from all the cultures of the neighboring countries and its invaders,” said panelist Gaia Franchetti, owner of IndoRoman, a

CITIZEN DIPLOMACY: A EU-CHINA CASE STUDY

https://www.uscpublicdiplomacy.org/story/citizen-diplomacy-eu-china-case-study Apr 2, 2019   What role do individual citizens play in the arena of public diplomacy and interstate relations?  University of Nottingham's Andreas Fulda's article, "The Emergence of Citizen Diplomacy in European Union–China Relations: Principles, Pillars, Pioneers, Paradoxes," seeks to address this question by analyzing the phenomenon of citizen diplomacy in EU-China relations. In his research, he examines the role of 12 "China practicing" diplomats from Europe who have engaged with mainland China for years in a variety of fields, ranging from psychoanalysis to climate change mitigation. "After revealing that European policy-makers are only reluctantly acknowledging the role of laymen in foreign policy-making vis-à-vis China, it shows that whilst citizen diplomacy may be a new concept in EU–China relations, it is actually not a new practice," explains Fulda. The

INDIA'S SOFT POWER

Apr 16, 2019   In December 2018, CPD served as primary academic partner for India's first major  Conference on Soft Power , hosted by the India Foundation in New Delhi. The three-day conference hosted speakers from industries essential to Indian culture nationally and abroad. They discussed how India can capitalize on its unique customs and cultural hallmarks to create a strong national brand to shape the country's future on the world stage. Some of the most powerful Indian cultural assets are textiles, dance and of course, yoga. CPD Graduate Student Journalism Fellow  Austin Maddox  sat down with three Indian thought-leaders in these fields about India's national brand and how the country can achieve its soft power goals. Art, Craft and Design Textile craftsmanship is one of the oldest Indian traditions that conveys “cultural motifs and patterns from all the cultures of the neighboring countries and its invaders,” said panelist Gaia Franchetti, owner of IndoRoman, a

Building Blocks of Disinformation: Case of Notre Dame

18 April 2019 *TRENDS OF THE WEEK* Building Blocks of Disinformation: Case of Notre Dame It took almost two hundred years, from 1163-1345, to  complete the construction  of Notre Dame Cathedral on a small island in the middle of the Seine. But it took only a couple of hours for the pro-Kremlin disinformation machine to exploit tragedy yet again and start spreading inflammatory, contradictory and divisive messages, even while the jewel of Paris still burned on Monday evening. The devastating fire brought down the cathedral’s famous spire and destroyed much of its roof. For pro-Kremlin disinformation, the matter of timing is frequently used as ultimate justification for  presenting different forms of conspiracies  around any tragedy. In the disinformation world, there are no coincidences. So false messages blamed the yellow vests for the fire, seeking revenge against Emmanuel Macron. Why? Because the fire started just before the president was supposed to  address the French people

Building Blocks of Disinformation: Case of Notre Dame

18 April 2019 *TRENDS OF THE WEEK* Building Blocks of Disinformation: Case of Notre Dame It took almost two hundred years, from 1163-1345, to  complete the construction  of Notre Dame Cathedral on a small island in the middle of the Seine. But it took only a couple of hours for the pro-Kremlin disinformation machine to exploit tragedy yet again and start spreading inflammatory, contradictory and divisive messages, even while the jewel of Paris still burned on Monday evening. The devastating fire brought down the cathedral’s famous spire and destroyed much of its roof. For pro-Kremlin disinformation, the matter of timing is frequently used as ultimate justification for  presenting different forms of conspiracies  around any tragedy. In the disinformation world, there are no coincidences. So false messages blamed the yellow vests for the fire, seeking revenge against Emmanuel Macron. Why? Because the fire started just before the president was supposed to  address the French people

Pagan Valley : Rising Islamic Influence Pressures An Ancient People

Pagan Valley : Rising Islamic Influence Pressures An Ancient People By Daud Khattak April 14, 2019 Nine-year-old Naveed Iqbal frequently accompanies his grandfather to mosque in this valley surrounded by the soaring peaks of the Hindu Kush mountains. But he doesn’t go inside — not yet, at least. “When I go inside to offer my prayer, he waits outside on the mosque stairs until I come out,” his grandfather, Bilal Shah, told RFE/RL in an interview in this hillside village in Bhamborit, one of three idyllic valleys in the Chitral district of Pakistan’s northwestern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province. Naveed is a member of the Kalash, a pagan community known for their fair skin that has long inhabited this area near the border with Afghanistan. The Kalash people, many of whom believe they are the descendants of the armies of Alexander the Great, have held on to their religious beliefs and colorful rituals for centuries, even as a sea of Islam has encircled them. But the unique traditions o

Which Rules? Why There is No Single ‘Rules-Based International System’

RUIS.ORG Malcolm Chalmers Occasional Papers , 10 April 2019 The contemporary international order comprises a Universal Security System, a Western System and a Universal Economic System. These dynamically interact with the bargains and relationships established by the major powers.   Download the paper here (PDF) Since the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review, there has been increased talk about the ‘rules-based international system’ (RBIS) in the UK’s foreign policy narrative. The concept has grown in popularity as the focus of national strategy has shifted towards Russia and China, after more than a decade of expeditionary state-building operations. This paper argues that there is no single RBIS. Rather, the post-1945 international settlement led to the creation of three distinct RBISs – a Universal Security System (USS), a Universal Economic System (UES) and a more exclusive Western System – alongside a set of Major Power Relations. The rules of each of the three rules-b