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Showing posts from October 13, 2019

An unintended effect of Modi govt’s Kashmir lockdown – militants caught in their own trap

The Print, India Militants in Kashmir have run into what Mao Zedong would call ‘contradictions of purpose’. ABHIJIT IYER-MITRA 18 October, 2019 10:00 am IST Villagers look on next to the debris of a house after a gunbattle between militants and security forces in Bandipora district, North Kashmir | Representational photo: ANI Text Size: A- A+ 334 Shares Every insurgency reaches a critical stage where some imperceptible shift in strategy changes the nature of the campaign, guaranteeing success or failure. Mao Zedong, the founding father of the People’s Republic of China, used to call it “contradictions of purpose”. The basic idea was to use civilians as human shields, and force the state’s security apparatus to overreact and alienate the local population. However, when state forces don’t fall into the trap, it’s usually the insurgents who start losing popular support. By  torching  apple orchards, attacking traders, and  killing  an apple trucker and a  stone crusher , militants

India must change its modus operandi towards Balochistan

On August 6 th  India constitutionally abrogated the conservative and absolutist Article 370 from the state of Jammu and Kashmir. The move – which proved to be a stumper for Pakistan’s diplomacy wing – triggered a fission of frustration catalysed with enigmas in Pakistan’s entire establishment. Pakistan’s frustration found many ways to carve itself out open on the world canvas, the darkest of it was their military and ISI’s sweating attempt at maligning India at the world stage. Every brush of the box was used to paint a case for liberation of Kashmir from Indian state and longing for the merger with Pakistan. Pakistan ever since its creation – which was a result of instalment of intense religious hatred, fundamentalism and extremism along with clever populistic political play – has used every trick to annex Kashmir from India. It partly, due to negligence of Indian state, succeeded in annexing a third of J&K in 1947. Bound by its ideology of Gazwa-e-hind, Pakistan has injected t

My Driver : Incident narrated by Sh. Nathan S V, Human Resources Leader at Deloitte

*My Driver : Incident narrated by Sh. Nathan S V,  Human Resources Leader at Deloitte (Incident narrated by Sh. Nathan S V,  Human Resources Leader at Deloitte.) ---------------------------------------- I was a freshly minted graduate of a leading B- School and wore its stripes proudly on my shoulders. I was to join a British Multinational in one of their plants in Gomia, Bihar as a Management Trainee. They chose only the best. And I was full of it, all puffed up. The night train from Calcutta would reach Gomia in the morning. I had a letter that said that there would be a car to pick me up from the station and take me to the guest house. The coal fired engine creaked up to the station and I alighted with my canvas hold-all, yes we had such things in those days. There was not a soul in sight to receive me. I felt let down. I heaved the luggage on my shoulder and came to the exit. There I saw a nice car. The driver in a khaki shorts and a white coloured tee shirt was walking towar

PAKISTAN: THE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM

PAKISTANTHE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM TILAK DEVASHER Conclusion ESSENTIALLY, PAKISTAN’S BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM IS that the state is trying to resolve a serious political issue militarily; instead of a surgeon’s delicate and deft touch, Pakistan is using a butcher’s cleaver. The roots of Baloch alienation and resentment run deep. The state, led by the army, just cannot or does not want to understand the import and depth of Baloch nationalism. Having learnt very little from the past, the Pakistan state, led by the army, sees the insurgency as a law and order problem that needs to be tackled militarily. The army does not see that the insurgency is not the real problem but is the result of a problem, and the problem is political. It goes to the heart of what kind of a state Pakistan is and whether minority nationalities like the Baloch can be accommodated equitably or will have to live subserviently under the dominant Punjabis. The army being overwhelmingly Punjabi is also part

PAKISTAN: THE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM

PAKISTANTHE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM TILAK DEVASHER Conclusion ESSENTIALLY, PAKISTAN’S BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM IS that the state is trying to resolve a serious political issue militarily; instead of a surgeon’s delicate and deft touch, Pakistan is using a butcher’s cleaver. The roots of Baloch alienation and resentment run deep. The state, led by the army, just cannot or does not want to understand the import and depth of Baloch nationalism. Having learnt very little from the past, the Pakistan state, led by the army, sees the insurgency as a law and order problem that needs to be tackled militarily. The army does not see that the insurgency is not the real problem but is the result of a problem, and the problem is political. It goes to the heart of what kind of a state Pakistan is and whether minority nationalities like the Baloch can be accommodated equitably or will have to live subserviently under the dominant Punjabis. The army being overwhelmingly Punjabi is also part

PAKISTAN: THE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM

PAKISTANTHE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM TILAK DEVASHER Conclusion ESSENTIALLY, PAKISTAN’S BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM IS that the state is trying to resolve a serious political issue militarily; instead of a surgeon’s delicate and deft touch, Pakistan is using a butcher’s cleaver. The roots of Baloch alienation and resentment run deep. The state, led by the army, just cannot or does not want to understand the import and depth of Baloch nationalism. Having learnt very little from the past, the Pakistan state, led by the army, sees the insurgency as a law and order problem that needs to be tackled militarily. The army does not see that the insurgency is not the real problem but is the result of a problem, and the problem is political. It goes to the heart of what kind of a state Pakistan is and whether minority nationalities like the Baloch can be accommodated equitably or will have to live subserviently under the dominant Punjabis. The army being overwhelmingly Punjabi is also part

PAKISTAN: THE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM

PAKISTANTHE BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM TILAK DEVASHER Conclusion ESSENTIALLY, PAKISTAN’S BALOCHISTAN CONUNDRUM IS that the state is trying to resolve a serious political issue militarily; instead of a surgeon’s delicate and deft touch, Pakistan is using a butcher’s cleaver. The roots of Baloch alienation and resentment run deep. The state, led by the army, just cannot or does not want to understand the import and depth of Baloch nationalism. Having learnt very little from the past, the Pakistan state, led by the army, sees the insurgency as a law and order problem that needs to be tackled militarily. The army does not see that the insurgency is not the real problem but is the result of a problem, and the problem is political. It goes to the heart of what kind of a state Pakistan is and whether minority nationalities like the Baloch can be accommodated equitably or will have to live subserviently under the dominant Punjabis. The army being overwhelmingly Punjabi is also part