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Showing posts from July 18, 2021

5 reasons the West lost in Afghanistan

The Western withdrawal from Afghanistan has gone hand in hand with a narrative of defeat, repeated so often it’s in danger of becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy. GREG MILLS 24 July, 2021 Source: The U.S. Army | Flickr A s NATO troops prepare to leave Afghanistan by 11 September 2021 in the face of a Taliban surge, a question remains unanswered: Why did the international intervenors fail in their mission to bring stability to Afghanistan? The Western withdrawal from Afghanistan has gone hand in hand with a narrative of defeat, repeated so often it’s in danger of becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy. Five reasons stand out to explain why the West has failed in its mission: The West’s best wasn’t good enough:  The lives of 3500 international troops plus an estimated 200,000 Afghans has not been sufficient to turn the tide against a highly motivated Taliban. This should not obscure the failure to accept from the outset that this was a strategic undertaking involving more than the toppling

Meet IPS officer Ankita Sharma who commands operation in Naxal stronghold Bastar

DNA Web Team  | Updated: Jul 24, 2021, 07:27 PM IST Ankita Sharma has been made ASP of Naxal-affected Bastar district of Chhattisgarh and is commanding ‘Operation Bastar’.Ankita Sharma is the first woman IPS officer of Chhattisgarh to get home cadre and now has been given a big responsibility. Ankita Sharma has been made ASP of Naxal-affected Bastar district of Chhattisgarh and is commanding ‘Operation Bastar’. She is identified as a domineering and powerful officer. Ankita is also known for her good looks, who often shares stylish photos on Instagram. Ankita is from small village of Durg IPS Ankita Sharma was born on 25 April 1992, in a small village of Durg district, Chhattisgarh. She did her early education from a government school. (Photo Source- Ankita Sharma Instagram) Success in 2018 According to a report of UPSC Pathshala, Ankita Sharma got success in her third attempt, in the year 2018. This year, she secured 203rd rank in the UPSC examination. After this, Ankita has become th

No place for centre to hide on Pegasus snoopgate

Published: 24th July 2021 07:12 AM     When a CBI chief’s cell phone numbers are added to a list drawn up for possible Pegasus hacking hours after he is forced to quit, the laboured defence of the Centre saying it has no role in the alleged snoopgate begins to crumble. For, who else could have initiated the surveillance in double quick time and benefited from it after  Alok Verma lost the job ? Pegasus is not just a spyware, it is a best-of-its-class dual-use cyber weapon system that is bound by export control rules. Israel, the country where it was developed, decides which government it can be sold to. Pegasus couldn’t have pried upon hundreds of Indians without entering the country. And it couldn’t have entered India without a deal with the Centre. Pegasus is designed to help neutralise national security threats, but if it is in the wrong hands, it could end up getting exploited for narrow personal gains. Is that what happened in India, as the list of its potential targets includes m

The Pegasus plot thickens

India Today The government staunchly denies allegations of having used foreign malware to snoop on private Indian citizens. But the controversy has raised major concerns about violations of individual privacy and effective checks to prevent misuse of state power New Delhi July 24, 2021 ISSUE DATE: August 2, 2021 UPDATED: July 24, 2021 09:38 IST Illustration by Nilanjan Das Is the Indian state running a mass surveillance programme, keeping tabs on journalists, human rights activists and opposition leaders along with its own ministers and key officials? This is the charge made by French news organisation Forbidden Stories and Amnesty International on July 18 in their serialised revelation of spying activities carried out by countries across the globe. The ‘Pegasus Project’, a global consortium of 17 media organisations including Indian news website www.thewire.in, suggests India is among the 45 countries using a malware developed by the Israel-based NSO group. The purported snoop list in

How to Be a Dictator by Frank Dikötter review – the cult of personality

Book of the day Charisma, a lust for power, an absence of principles … what links Mao, Mussolini, Stalin, Hitler and other 20th-century dictators? Sheila Fitzpatrick Sat 26 Oct 2019 02.30 EDT Born in obscurity, frustrated in youth, the dictator rises through accident, patronage or anything except merit to blossom into a fully fledged evil-doer, desperate for the respect and admiration that are wrung from the populace only by skilled PR manipulation. Often feigning modesty, he soon generates a cult that he personally develops. Women and even brave men feel overcome in his presence; schoolchildren chant the praise of the father of the nation; artists and writers deify the great leader. Dictators generally come equipped with an ideology, but since they have no principles, only a lust for power, the process of propagation turns it into a mockery. Although dictators often fancy themselves as writers or philosophers, they fail to make the grade as intellectuals, and the Little Red Books they